The Competing Jurisdictions of International Courts and Tribunals

Paperback | January 11, 2005

byYuval Shany

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Recent years have witnessed a sharp increase in the number of international courts and tribunals (WTO, NAFTA, ITLOS, ICC, etc.) and greater willingness on the part of states and other international actors to subject themselves to the compulsory jurisdiction of international adjudicativemechanisms. However, because of the uncoordinated nature of these developments, overlaps between the jurisdictional ambits of the different judicial bodies might occur, i.e., the same dispute could fall under the jurisdiction of more than one forum. This raises both theoretical and practical issuesof coordination between the various jurisdictions.The purpose of this book is to explore the implications of jurisdictional competition and to identify standards that may alleviate problems associated with the phenomenon, which arguably threatens the unity of international law. The first part of the book examines the jurisdictional ambits of theprincipal international courts and tribunals and delineates areas of overlap between their respective jurisdictions. There follows a discussion of some of the potential systematic and practical problems that arise out of jurisdictional competition (such as forum shopping and multiple proceedings)and a consideration of the expediency of mitigating them. The book concludes by identifying existing rules of international law, which govern inter-jurisdictional competition, and by considering the desirability of introducing additional norms and arrangements.

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Recent years have witnessed a sharp increase in the number of international courts and tribunals (WTO, NAFTA, ITLOS, ICC, etc.) and greater willingness on the part of states and other international actors to subject themselves to the compulsory jurisdiction of international adjudicativemechanisms. However, because of the uncoordinated ...

Yuval Shany is a full-time Lecturer at the College of Management, Academic Studies Division, Israel.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:424 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.96 inPublished:January 11, 2005Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199274282

ISBN - 13:9780199274284

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Table of Contents

Introductionpart I Overlaps between the Jurisdictions of International Courts and Tribunals1. What Constitutes Competing Proceedings?2. Delineation of Jurisdictional Overlaps: Theory and PracticePart II Legal and Policy Issues Concerning the Competition between the Jurisdictions of International Courts and Tribunals3. Jurisdictional Competition in View of the Systematic Nature of International Courts and Tribunals4. Jurisdiction-Regulating Norms Governing Competition Involving Domestic Courts: Should They be Introduced into International Law?Part III The Regulation of Competition between Jurisdictions of International Courts and Tribunals: lex lata and lex ferenda5. Competition-Regulating Norms found in Instruments Governing the Jurisdiction of International Courts and Tribunals6. Jurisdiction-Regulating Norms, Derived From Sources Other than Treaties, as Applied by International Courts and Tribunals7. Possibilities for Future ImprovementConclusionsTable of AuthoritiesIndex

Editorial Reviews

`Yuval Shany's book is an original, useful and timely response to the recent academic need to examine the phenomenon of competing jurisdictions in international law. It will undoubtedly retain its importance and significance in the foreseeable future.'The Cambridge Law Journal