The Contemplative Mind In The Scholarship Of Teaching And Learning by Patricia Owen-smithThe Contemplative Mind In The Scholarship Of Teaching And Learning by Patricia Owen-smith

The Contemplative Mind In The Scholarship Of Teaching And Learning

byPatricia Owen-smith

Paperback | November 30, 2017

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InThe Contemplative Mind in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Patricia Owen-Smith considers how contemplative practices may find a place in higher education. By creating a bridge between contemplative practices and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), Owen-Smith brings awareness of contemplative pedagogy to a larger audience of college instructors, while also offering classroom models and outlining the ongoing challenges of both defining these practices and assessing their impact in education. Ultimately, Owen-Smith asserts that such practices have the potential to deepen a student's development and understanding of the self as a learner, knower, and citizen of the world.

Patricia Owen-Smith is Professor of Psychology and Women's Studies at Oxford College of Emory University. She is the founder and director of Oxford College's Women's Studies and Service-Learning programs.
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Title:The Contemplative Mind In The Scholarship Of Teaching And LearningFormat:PaperbackDimensions:208 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:November 30, 2017Publisher:Indiana University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:025303177X

ISBN - 13:9780253031778

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
1. A Historical Review
2. Contemplative Practices in Higher Education
3. Challenges and Replies to Contemplative Methods
4. Contemplative Research
5. The Contemplative Mind: A Vision of Higher Education for the 21st Century
Coda
References
Index

Editorial Reviews

At a time when accelerated learning drives so much of what occurs in the classroom, . . . the author proposes to slow things down and to have students and teachers alike see the power and meaning in silent and slow reflection.