The Cotton Manufacture Of Great Britain Systematically Investigated (volume 2); With An Introductory View Of Its Comparative State In Foreign Countrie by Andrew UreThe Cotton Manufacture Of Great Britain Systematically Investigated (volume 2); With An Introductory View Of Its Comparative State In Foreign Countrie by Andrew Ure

The Cotton Manufacture Of Great Britain Systematically Investigated (volume 2); With An…

byAndrew Ure

Paperback | February 2, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836. Excerpt: ... Montgomery's Patent Spindle. In April 1832, Mr. Robert Montgomery, of the town of Johnstone, in Scotland, obtained a patent for a modification of the throstle, as communicated to him by the American inventor. This contrivance consists in a certain addition to the flyers, which keeps them in the same position, while the spindles are caused to rise and fall, for the purpose of laying the thread regularly on the bobbins; the spindles not being permitted to turn, because they are fixed to the bottom or cross-rail. By this means he supposes the flyers and spindles will be less liable to vibrate than as they are commonly constructed. In this machine (see fig. 75,) the spindle i, on which the bobbin is built, does not revolve, because it is made fast to the bottom or cross-rail f, and is moved or slidden up and down within the flyer a, a, so as to carry the bobbin along with it, whereby the yarn may be laid regularly upon the bobbin. This is loose, but bears upon the boss, which is fixed upon the spindle, and is allowed to run on it, in consequence of the friction or drag of the yarn, as shown at the spindle A. The rail h, h, into which the spindles are secured, is made to travel up and down in the usual way, as we have already described under the common throstle. In spinning soft yarns, they may be wound either upon the bobbin, or upon a tube or shell, as shown at the spindle B; which, when full, will be of a proper size and shape to be placed in the shuttle. At the spindle C, the yarn is represented as laid upon the bare spindle, and in order that the friction should be as much relieved as possible, a small auxi VOL. II. H liary spindle is inserted into a hollow part of the fixed spindle, as shown in section at D. The fitting of the auxiliary spindle into the ...
Title:The Cotton Manufacture Of Great Britain Systematically Investigated (volume 2); With An…Format:PaperbackDimensions:78 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.16 inPublished:February 2, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217075711

ISBN - 13:9780217075718

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