The Courage to Become: The Virtues of Humanism

Hardcover | June 1, 1997

byPaul Kurtz

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Does life have meaning if one rejects belief in God? This book responds affirmatively to that question. Paul Kurtz, America's leading secular humanist, provides a powerful defense of the humanist alternative, rejecting both religious spirituality and nihilism. In this inspirational book, Kurtz outlines the basic virtues of the secular humanist outlook. These virtues include courage, not simply to be or to survive, but to overcome and become; that is, to fulfill our highest aspirations and ideals in the face of obstacles. The two other virtues Kurtz identifies are cognition (reason and science in establishing truth) and moral caring (compassion and benevolence in our relationships with others.) Kurtz offers an optimistic appraisal of the "human prospect" and outlines a philosophy both for the individual and the global community.

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Does life have meaning if one rejects belief in God? This book responds affirmatively to that question. Paul Kurtz, America's leading secular humanist, provides a powerful defense of the humanist alternative, rejecting both religious spirituality and nihilism. In this inspirational book, Kurtz outlines the basic virtues of the secular ...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:152 pages, 9.42 × 6.06 × 0.68 inPublished:June 1, 1997Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275958973

ISBN - 13:9780275958978

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?Kurtz, a former copresident of the International Humanist and Ethical Union, says he is writing not philosophy but eupraxophy--instruction for a good and practical life....This is not a book to persuade nonhumanists but rather to provide a clear, readable, and encouraging outline of the prospects for those who put their trust in science alone....it does its job very well...?-Library Journal