The Craft Apprentice: From Franklin to the Machine Age in America by W.j. RorabaughThe Craft Apprentice: From Franklin to the Machine Age in America by W.j. Rorabaugh

The Craft Apprentice: From Franklin to the Machine Age in America

byW.j. Rorabaugh

Paperback | April 30, 1999

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The apprentice system in colonial America began as a way for young men to learn valuable trade skills from experienced artisans and mechanics and soon flourished into a fascinating and essential social institution. Benjamin Franklin got his start in life as an apprentice, as did Mark Twain,Horace Greeley, William Dean Howells, William Lloyd Garrison, and many other famous Americans. But the Industrial Revolution brought with it radical changes in the lives of craft apprentices. In this book, W. J. Rorabaugh has woven an intriguing collection of case histories, gleaned from numerousletters, diaries, and memoirs, into a narrative that examines the varied experiences of individual apprentices and documents the massive changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution.
W.J. Rorabaugh is at University of Washington, Seattle.
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Title:The Craft Apprentice: From Franklin to the Machine Age in AmericaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 7.99 × 5.39 × 0.59 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195051890

ISBN - 13:9780195051896

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From Our Editors

This book tells what it was like to be a craft apprentice in America before, during, and after the early Industrial Revolution. The story begins in colonial America, when apprenticeship served several important functions.

Editorial Reviews

"Using hundreds of autobiographies, diaries, and letters, Rorabaugh...pieces together the broad outlines of the apprentice's experience and the impact of the American Revolution, the ideology of equality, technological changes, and the Civil War on the relations between masters andapprentices....Should be read by all students interested in the history of labor and education."--Choice