The Crime in Mind: Criminal Responsibility and the Victorian Novel

Paperback | January 6, 2004

byLisa Rodensky

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This interdisciplinary study of legal and literary narratives argues that the novel's particular power to represent the interior life of its characters both challenges the law's definitions of criminal responsibility and reaffirms them. By means of connecting major novelists with prominentjurists and legal historians of the era, it offers profound new ways of thinking about the Victorian period.

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This interdisciplinary study of legal and literary narratives argues that the novel's particular power to represent the interior life of its characters both challenges the law's definitions of criminal responsibility and reaffirms them. By means of connecting major novelists with prominentjurists and legal historians of the era, it off...

Lisa Rodensky is Assistant Professor of English at Wellesley College.

other books by Lisa Rodensky

The Oxford Handbook of the Victorian Novel
The Oxford Handbook of the Victorian Novel

Kobo ebook|Jul 11 2013

$169.99

Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 6.1 × 9.21 × 0.71 inPublished:January 6, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195150740

ISBN - 13:9780195150742

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"The Crime in Mind creates an intricate and compelling dialogue between nineteenth-century legal philosophers and Victorian novelists. Trained in both law and literature, Lisa Rodensky brings a marvelous gift for articulating distinctions to bear on the relations between thoughts and acts,acts and intentions, intentions and consequences. In the process, she offers some of the best commentary available on the activities of third-person narrators as they move in and out of their characters's minds."--Rosemarie Bodenheimer, Boston College