The Crime Novel: A Deviant Genre by Tony HilferThe Crime Novel: A Deviant Genre by Tony Hilfer

The Crime Novel: A Deviant Genre

byTony Hilfer

Paperback | October 1, 1990

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Although rarely distinguished from the detective story, the crime novel offers readers a quite different experience. In the detective novel, a sympathetic detective figure uses reason and intuition to solve the puzzle, restore order, and reassure readers that "right" will always prevail. In the crime novel, by contrast, the "hero" is either the killer, the victim, a guilty bystander, or someone falsely accused, and the crime may never be satisfactorily solved.

These and other fundamental differences are set out by Tony Hilfer in The Crime Novel, the first book that completely defines and explores this popular genre. Hilfer offers convincing evidence that the crime novel should be regarded as a genre distinct from the detective novel, whose conventions it subverts to develop conventions of its own.

Hilfer provides in-depth analyses of novels by Georges Simenon, Margaret Millar, Patricia Highsmith, and Jim Thompson. He also treats such British novelists as Patrick Hamilton, Shelley Smith, and Marie Belloc Lowndes, as well as the American novelists Cornell Woolrich, John Franklin Bardin, James M. Cain, and Fredric Brown. In addition, he defines the distinctions between the American crime novel and the British, showing how their differences correspond to differences in American and British detective fiction.

This well-written study will appeal to a general audience, as well as teachers and students of detective and mystery fiction. For anyone interested in the genre, it offers valuable suggestions of "what to read next."

Tony Hilfer (1936-2008) was Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin.
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Title:The Crime Novel: A Deviant GenreFormat:PaperbackDimensions:192 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:October 1, 1990Publisher:University Of Texas Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0292711360

ISBN - 13:9780292711365

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Reviews

Table of Contents

  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • 1. The Crime Novel: Guilt and Menace
  • 2. Deviant Impulses: Incest and Doubling
  • 3. Ontological Insecurities: Time and Space in the American Crime Novel
  • 4. Devil or Angel: Fatal Passion in the American Crime Novel
  • 5. Pale Criminals and Murderees: The Problem of Justice in the English Crime Novel
  • 6. Civilization and Its Discontents: Simenon, Millar, Highsmith, and Thompson
  • Coda
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Editorial Reviews

Although rarely distinguished from the detective story, the crime novel offers readers a quite different experience. In the detective novel, a sympathetic detective figure uses reason and intuition to solve the puzzle, restore order, and reassure readers that "right" will always prevail. In the crime novel, by contrast, the "hero" is either the killer, the victim, a guilty bystander, or someone falsely accused, and the crime may never be satisfactorily solved.These and other fundamental differences are set out by Tony Hilfer in The Crime Novel, the first book that completely defines and explores this popular genre. Hilfer offers convincing evidence that the crime novel should be regarded as a genre distinct from the detective novel, whose conventions it subverts to develop conventions of its own.Hilfer provides in-depth analyses of novels by Georges Simenon, Margaret Millar, Patricia Highsmith, and Jim Thompson. He also treats such British novelists as Patrick Hamilton, Shelley Smith, and Marie Belloc Lowndes, as well as the American novelists Cornell Woolrich, John Franklin Bardin, James M. Cain, and Fredric Brown. In addition, he defines the distinctions between the American crime novel and the British, showing how their differences correspond to differences in American and British detective fiction.This well-written study will appeal to a general audience, as well as teachers and students of detective and mystery fiction. For anyone interested in the genre, it offers valuable suggestions of "what to read next.""[Hilfer] covers most of the major writers of crime novels and deals intelligently and interestingly with the major theme and forms of the genre . .. . [This] is a significant and original contribution to a field which has never been adequately treated before." - John G. Cawelti, Professor of English, University of Kentucky