The Cultural Politics of Sugar: Caribbean Slavery and Narratives of Colonialism by Keith A. SandifordThe Cultural Politics of Sugar: Caribbean Slavery and Narratives of Colonialism by Keith A. Sandiford

The Cultural Politics of Sugar: Caribbean Slavery and Narratives of Colonialism

byKeith A. Sandiford

Paperback | August 5, 2010

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Keith Sandiford's study examines the importance of sugar as a central metaphor in the work of six influential authors of the colonial West Indies. Sugar, he argues, became a focus for cultural desires as well as a hard fact of the Caribbean's political economy. Sandiford defines this metaphorical turn as a trope of "negotiation" that organizes the structure and content of the narratives. Based on extensive historical knowledge of the period and recent postcolonial theory, this book suggests the possibilities negotiation offers in the continuing recovery of West Indian intellectual history.
Title:The Cultural Politics of Sugar: Caribbean Slavery and Narratives of ColonialismFormat:PaperbackDimensions:228 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.51 inPublished:August 5, 2010Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521645395

ISBN - 13:9780521645393

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. Ligon: 'Sweete negotiation'; 2. Rochefort: French collusions to negotiate; 3. Grainger: creolizing the muse; 4. Schaw: a 'saccharocracy' of virtue; 5. Beckford: the aesthetics of negotiation; 6. Lewis: personalizing the 'negotium'; Postscript and prospect; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Sandiford brings the analysis of metropolitan writings about colonized regions to the Caribbean,...analyz[ing] the works of six metroplitan writers from the 17th to the 19th centuries." Choice