The Culture Of The High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome by Ingrid D. RowlandThe Culture Of The High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome by Ingrid D. Rowland

The Culture Of The High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome

byIngrid D. Rowland

Paperback | January 15, 2001

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Between 1480 and 1520, a concentration of talented artists, including Melozzo da Forlì, Bramante, Pinturicchio, Raphael, and Michelangelo, arrived in Rome and produced some of the most enduring works of art ever created. This period, now called the High Renaissance, is generally considered to be one of the high points of Western civilisation. How did it come about, and what were the forces that converged to spark such an explosion of creative activity? In this study, Ingrid Rowland examines the culture, society, and intellectual norms that generated the High Renaissance. This interdisciplinary 2001 study assesses the intellectual paradigm shift that occurred at the turn of the fifteenth century. It also finds and explains the connections between ideas, people, and the art works they created by looking at economics, art, contemporary understanding of classical antiquity, and social conventions.
Title:The Culture Of The High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century RomeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:448 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.98 inPublished:January 15, 2001Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521794412

ISBN - 13:9780521794411

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Table of Contents

1. Initiation; 2. Alexandria on the Tiber (1492-1503); 3. The curial marketplace; 4. The cultural marketplace; 5. Tabulation; 6. Sweating towards Parnassus (1503-13); 7. Imitation (1513-21); 8. Epilogue: Reformation (1517-25).

Editorial Reviews

'... splendid monograph from which every student of Renaissance Rome will profit immensely.' Latomus