The Daughters Return: African-American and Caribbean Womens Fictions of History

Hardcover | April 15, 2001

byCaroline Rody

not yet rated|write a review
The Daughter's Return offers a close analysis of an emerging genre in African-American and Caribbean fiction produced by women writers who make imaginative returns to their ancestral pasts. Considering some of the defining texts of contemporary fiction--Toni Morrison's Beloved, Jean Rhys'sWide Sargasso Sea, and Michelle Cliff's No Telephone to Heaven--Rody discusses their common inclusion of a daughter who returns to the site of her people's founding trauma of slavery through memory or magic. Rody treats these texts as allegorical expressions of the desire of writers newly emerginginto cultural authority to reclaim their difficult inheritance, and finds a counter plot of heroines' encounters with women of other racial and ethnic groups running through these works.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$69.18
$97.95 list price save 29%
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

The Daughter's Return offers a close analysis of an emerging genre in African-American and Caribbean fiction produced by women writers who make imaginative returns to their ancestral pasts. Considering some of the defining texts of contemporary fiction--Toni Morrison's Beloved, Jean Rhys'sWide Sargasso Sea, and Michelle Cliff's No Tele...

Caroline Rody is at University of Virginia.

other books by Caroline Rody

Format:HardcoverPublished:April 15, 2001Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195138880

ISBN - 13:9780195138887

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The Daughters Return: African-American and Caribbean Womens Fictions of History

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

"Meticulously researched and admirably lucid in style and argument, The Daughter's Return is an immensely readable as well as an intellectually robust addition to and intervention in the critical response to African American and Caribbean women's writing."--Contemporary Literature