The Death Of King Arthur

Paperback | April 30, 1972

byJames AnonymousTranslated byJames Cable

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Recounting the final days of Arthur, this thirteenth-century French version of the Camelot legend, written by an unknown author, is set in a world of fading chivalric glory. It depicts the Round Table diminished in strength after the Quest for the Holy Grail, and with its integrity threatened by the weakness of Arthur's own knights. Whispers of Queen Guinevere's infidelity with his beloved comrade-at-arms Sir Lancelot profoundly distress the trusting King, leaving him no match for the machinations of the treacherous Sir Mordred. The human tragedy of The Death of King Arthur so impressed Malory that he built his own Arthurian legend on this view of the court - a view that profoundly influenced the English conception of the 'great' King. 

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From Our Editors

Translator James Cable makes one of the most exceptional medieval French Arthurian romances accessible to English-speaking readers. In the twilight of the Arthurian world, the Round Table is sadly diminished in numbers and in spirit after the Quest of the Holy Grail. The Death of King Arthur covers Lancelot’s persisting adultery wi...

From the Publisher

Recounting the final days of Arthur, this thirteenth-century French version of the Camelot legend, written by an unknown author, is set in a world of fading chivalric glory. It depicts the Round Table diminished in strength after the Quest for the Holy Grail, and with its integrity threatened by the weakness of Arthur's own knights. Wh...

From the Jacket

‘Lancelot has brought me such great shame as to dishonour me through my wife, I shall never rest till they are caught together’Recounting the final days of Arthur, this thirteenth-century French version of the Camelot legend, written by an unknown author, is set in a world of fading chivalric glory. It depicts the Round Table diminishe...

The author of The Death of King Arthur is unknown, though it is generally thought he was a Frenchman, probably from Champagne writing around 1230-35. James Cable was educated at Exeter and Nancy Universities and holds a Ph.D. in Old French. He was subsequently a lecturer in French at London University.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 7.8 × 5.1 × 0.6 inPublished:April 30, 1972Publisher:Penguin Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0140442553

ISBN - 13:9780140442557

Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18

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Customer Reviews of The Death Of King Arthur

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Death of King Arthur, by Anonymous Sitting quaint in my favourite used book store, this tiny book ( at only $1.99) was just waiting for the right person to pick it up and give it a chance. I’m so glad I did! The Death of King Arthur, is the famous king's tale written by an unknown author - ‘but most probably a Frenchman from Champagne, writing around 1230-35.’ This in itself got me so curious, that I just had to read it- if not for the story but at least for the flavor of reading something so old. I love the feeling of period writing because it really sets the mood for the piece. This one did not disappoint. In The Death Of King Arthur, we read about all the great knights: Lancelot, Sir Gawain, Hector, Mador… Not only do we get the exciting battles fought for principle and reputation, there is so much gallantry, respect, honor and chivalry that make this book a precious piece of literature. Arthur’s beautiful Queen is at the center of this story, causing much dilemma between both Arthur and Lancelot. The book is straightforward and although there are no flowery parts or picturesque moments or scenes, in its purity, this story does not need embellishing. What a refreshing read! Seemingly told by the author, as though he were narrating, I came to accept abrupt changes in the story that simply went like this: For example, ‘And now the story stops telling of Bors and his company, and returns to Lancelot…’ As strange and cut-off as this may seem, something that would never work in today’s writing, but considering the source and the time, it still works perfectly in this novel. All I can say is that I really enjoyed reading this amazing tale, although simplistic in its form and told in such a straightforward manner, The Death of King Arthur managed to capture my interest and my heart. It made me remember why it is that I love Penguin Classics so much. Simply beautiful.
Date published: 2010-03-29

Extra Content

From Our Editors

Translator James Cable makes one of the most exceptional medieval French Arthurian romances accessible to English-speaking readers. In the twilight of the Arthurian world, the Round Table is sadly diminished in numbers and in spirit after the Quest of the Holy Grail. The Death of King Arthur covers Lancelot’s persisting adultery with Guinevere, treacherous Mordred’s arrival, the last battle at Salisbury, Arthur and Lancelot’s deaths and the Kingdom of Logres’ destruction. Melancholic, simple and elegant, the text avoids the absurd fantasy that characterizes other period French romances. This enduring legend continues to move today’s readers.