The Death of the Shtetl by Yehuda BauerThe Death of the Shtetl by Yehuda Bauer

The Death of the Shtetl

byYehuda Bauer

Paperback | December 7, 2010

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In this book, Yehuda Bauer, an internationally acclaimed Holocaust historian, describes the destruction of small Jewish townships, the shtetls, in what was the eastern  part of Poland by the Nazis in 1941–1942. Bauer brings together all available documents, testimonies, and scholarship, including previously unpublished material from the Yad Vashem archives, pertaining to nine representative shtetls. In line with his belief that “history is the story of real people in real situations,” Bauer tells moving stories about what happened to individual Jews and their communities.

Over a million people, approximately a quarter of all victims of the Holocaust, came from the  shtetls. Bauer writes of the relations between Jews and non-Jews (including the actions of rescuers); he also describes attempts to create underground resistance groups, efforts to escape to the forests, and Jewish participation in the Soviet partisan movement. Bauer’s book is a definitive examination of the demise of the shtetls, a topic of vast importance to the history of the Holocaust.

Yehuda Bauer is academic adviser at Yad Vashem, Jerusalem, and professor emeritus of Holocaust studies, Hebrew University. He is the author of many books, including Jews for Sale? and Rethinking the Holocaust, both published by Yale University Press.
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Title:The Death of the ShtetlFormat:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.68 inPublished:December 7, 2010Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300167938

ISBN - 13:9780300167931

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Yehuda Bauer is a masterful historian who has shared. . . . his insights on how to understand the Holocaust. He brings his maturity as a scholar, his clarity, and his ability to tell a story to this book. This is a most significant contribution to Holocaust scholarship."—Paula Hyman, Yale University