The Decline of the German Mandarins: The German Academic Community, 1890-1933 by Fritz K. RingerThe Decline of the German Mandarins: The German Academic Community, 1890-1933 by Fritz K. Ringer

The Decline of the German Mandarins: The German Academic Community, 1890-1933

byFritz K. Ringer

Paperback | December 1, 1990

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A splendid re-publication of an indispensable book on German history.
Born in Ludwighafen, Germany, FRITZ K. RINGER came to the United States with his family in 1949. He is Mellon Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh. This book, first published in 1969, received much attention in its 1983 German edition. He is also author of The German Inflation of 1923 (1969) and Education and Society of...
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Title:The Decline of the German Mandarins: The German Academic Community, 1890-1933Format:PaperbackDimensions:548 pages, 1 × 1 × 0.68 inPublished:December 1, 1990Publisher:Wesleyan University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0819562351

ISBN - 13:9780819562357

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Table of Contents

Introduction: The Mandarin Type
The Social and Institutional Backround
the Mandarin Tradition in Retrospect
Politics and Social Theory
The Political Conflict at Its Height, 1918-1933
The Origins of Cultural Crisis, 1890-1920
From Revival to the Crisis of Learning, 1890-1920
The Crisis of Learning at Its Height, 1920-1933
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Editorial Reviews

“What makes the book particularly useful, in addition to its thoroughness and meticulous documentation, is its eminent fair-mindedness. In the midst of reaction, complacency, and myth-making, there were professors, not radicals but firmly within the establishment, who broke loose from accepted commonplaces to make contributions to their disciplines that remain of significance today. These men – one thinks of Max Weber above all – were complicated creatures, and Ringer judiciously finds his way through the literature and jumble of conflicting claims.” —Peter Gay, New Republic