The Dinner

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The Dinner

by Herman Koch

Thorndike Press | June 26, 2013 | Hardcover

The Dinner is rated 2.2963 out of 5 by 27.
On a summer's evening in Amsterdam, two couples meet at a fashionable restaurant for dinner. Between mouthfuls of food, the conversation remains a gentle hum of polite discourse. But behind the empty words, terrible things need to be said. Each couple has a fifteen- year- old son. The boys are united by their accountability for a single horrific act. As civility and friendship disintegrate, both couples show just how far they will go to protect those they love.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 420 pages, 8.6 × 5.7 × 1 in

Published: June 26, 2013

Publisher: Thorndike Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1410459292

ISBN - 13: 9781410459299

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Dinner Two brothers, their wives and their two absent - yet very present - 15 year olds sit down to dinner at a very fancy restaurant to talk about what to do about a very disturbing secret. This book is fast paced and intriguing - a good read.
Date published: 2015-04-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Recommended! This is a book that I’ve been wanting to read for ages. I’ve borrowed it from the library and to return it unread two or three times, and when I had the chance to borrow a copy recently, I knew the time had come. I was going to read this book at last! So I knew the very basics of the plot before I started reading, and I really thought I knew how this story was going to play out, but I was so wrong! I read so many books and predict so many endings that I just love when I have no clue what is going to happen. This book really played with my expectations and while the characters went from irritating to monstrous pretty quickly – they were all so awful and unlikeable! – I do love when a book genuinely surprises me the way The Dinner did. Koch takes a simple premise and takes the story from what could be an ordinary, boring dinner and turns it (and my expectations) on its head. I read the majority of the book in a single sitting and finished it right before my usual bedtime. I was so angry and frustrated with these characters, though, that I had to stay up a little later than usual. There was no way I was going to fall asleep right after finishing this book! Definitely recommended!
Date published: 2015-01-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great read! Exciting and quick read. Read it before film is out. Bought two copies as gifts for the readers in my life. Highly recommended.
Date published: 2015-01-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from The Dinner is Not for Dessert A lot of hype around this novel, and I think the fact that it was referred to as the European Gone Girl, really drove it's sales, although any of Flynn's 3 books are fabulous and cannot be compared to The Dinner. That being said.... The Dinner was well-written, in my opinion. I feel like you really felt for the main mom and dad and their normal life, with their normal son until the abnormal happens, which has a nice, slow build-up to what actually went down. I enjoyed the very tense dinner between the 2 brothers and their wives, trying to discuss while at the same time not discuss the 'incident'. What I really enjoyed about this novel was the lengths that parents will go to to protect their children and themselves. However, I found there was a little too much detail for certain superfluous moments in the book that made it a bit boring to get through.
Date published: 2014-07-09
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Awful There were no redeeming qualities to this book, it was sick and had no point. Funny how it actually refers to reading a book to the end even though you don't like it... I wish I'd stopped sooner.
Date published: 2014-06-27
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Awful I wish I'd read the reviews before I bought this book, it was really awful and completely unbelievable.
Date published: 2014-02-20
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Wouldn't reccomend it "The Dinner" was on the wishlist of the person I drew for Secret Santa this year. I was intrigued by the hype, and dowloaded the ebook. I hope the recipient isn't as dissapointed as I was. I found the book to be a very slow read, and it didn't draw me in to the characters. Where the writer tried to create suspense by limiting the details, it created frustration as I didn't want to read through 10 pages to get what could have been written in 5. The books content was drawn out and interspersed with a lot of filler, and just wasn't a good match for me. Had I of not read all the hype beforehand, I would have just thought this was a mediocre story, but I had high expectations and was left wanting more.
Date published: 2014-01-11
Rated 1 out of 5 by from The Dinner Sorry, don't like to be negative, but I didn't like it at all and wished I hadn't wasted the time or $$$ ... just not worth it!
Date published: 2013-12-11
Rated 1 out of 5 by from terrible I saw this book in the front of the store and was immediately drawn to it based on the cover. It was a very slow, and dry read. After I was finished, I was not sure what the point of the whole book was. 
Date published: 2013-11-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Dinner So many things to admire about this book: laser-precise character observations, a storyline that somehow manages to be both riveting and banal, and suspense cunningly built through ordinary human interactions. Every line in this book made me think. Every other line made me second-guess something I thought I had all figured out. When I finished this book, I pondered the themes and my reaction to them. The subject matter disturbed me, by times, as it was intended to. Koch pushes us to contemplate cultural norms we love to cling to. He explores sibling relationships, hero worship, mental illness, homelessness, parental decisions, social pretenses, and the sticky issue of who is worthy of living or dying. Herman Koch wraps up mystery novel, social satire, and character study in a simple dinner conversation package. Admirable.
Date published: 2013-10-09
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Pretty terrible Honestly I can't believe I wasted my money purchasing this book. If you're looking for something to put you to sleep while stealing your money, this is the book for you.
Date published: 2013-09-23
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Big Disappointment Not at all "European Gone Girl" worthy. Slow draggy text that makes you wonder whether its worth it to continue on. Even worse ending that makes you lose hope that karma really does get those who have it coming. All in all this was a terrible read that I am in awe I even had the strength to finish reading
Date published: 2013-08-10
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Too Much Hype Paul and his brother Serge are taking their wives out for dinner at an upscale restaurant. Serge has arranged the dinner at a restaurant that is well out of Paul’s budget. That’s always a problem, but there are other reasons the two brothers do not get along. As the dinner progresses Paul cannot help but continually think back to the unusual happenings at home lately. What exactly is going on with his son? As the dessert course approaches we learn that this dinner is not just an ordinary dinner – the two couples are here to discuss their children. I have been procrastinating about writing the review of this book because I have a difficult time writing negative reviews. Particularly when the book is well written. And this book is very well written, in my opinion, it just does not live up to the hype. I never got involved enough to care about the characters, so when the big reveal happened I just shrugged my shoulders. A little slow moving and just not my cup of tea. This is one of those cases where, if I had been reading the book rather than listening to it on audio, I would have closed the covers and added it the “nope, cannot finish this” pile.
Date published: 2013-07-26
Rated 1 out of 5 by from not what I expected I'm always disappointed when I read book that is very hyped up. This book is not at all like 'Gone Girl', I don't know where that idea even came from. It was a bit scattered, but it was interesting. There was a lot of useless nonsense that dragged the book out much longer than necessary.
Date published: 2013-07-19
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Nowhere near the caliber of Gone Girl Having read this reviewed as "the European Gone Girl" I was so excited to get wrapped up in this book. However, it left me constantly waiting to see what was next...and not in the on the edge of your seat way. I was literally waiting for something remotely exciting to happen throughout the whole book. Very bland, didn't really get it? The plot development was slow and at times irrelevant to the deeper character development slowly (and I mean slowly) exposed over the course of the dinner.
Date published: 2013-06-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Beautifully written but a little weird The Dinner is one of those difficult to review books. Mostly because there’s so little I can say about it without giving anything away. On the surface this is the story of two brothers, and their wives getting together to eat dinner. One brother is relatively well known in the community. The other thinks his brother is a buffoon. Recipe for a pleasant family meal right? I have to admit I was a little skeptical when I heard the entire novel takes place over the course of one dinner. But once you meet these characters you’ll want to sit back and watch the drama unfold. They’re all pretty despicable people. It’s like watching reality TV. You don’t actually like the people you’re watching but you want to see them interact with one another. Each character was incredibly well described and you could just imagine all their mannerisms and back handed comments. I need to say it again – these were horrible people! They were so mean! In a way it kind of reminded me of a Martin Amis. Cruel characters, sharp wit, wry observations. Never a dull moment. Of course, there is more to The Dinner than just a group of interesting, cruel characters. There is something deeper and darker going on just below all the surface tension. Herman Koch does a good job, slowly unraveling the mystery strand by strand. I wasn’t too surprised when the big reveal finally came out but I still really enjoyed watching all the characters put everything together. Watching this huge bombshell drop was just as entertaining as a surprise twist would have been. Recommendation: Herman Koch has written a beautifully detailed, delicious mystery that has you questioning the power of family ties and wondering what exactly happened to humanity and compassion. This and other reviews at More Than Just Magic (http://morethanjustmagic.org)
Date published: 2013-06-24
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Was not was I expected... at all. Did not even finish the book. Too many long and boring moments. I kept falling asleep!
Date published: 2013-06-18
Rated 2 out of 5 by from So So All and all it was not a bad read. I thought that is was very slow and quite boring in some spots. The ending of the book was pretty dumb.
Date published: 2013-04-15
Rated 1 out of 5 by from So disappointed! I was very much looking forward to this read and initially was enjoying the book very much, but the enjoyment wore off before the halfway point. The story is weak, and by the end I can say I disliked every single character in the book, and would not recommend this one to anyone. Don't waste your time or money!
Date published: 2013-04-11
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Unfulfilled! When their sons commit a senseless crime, two families decide whether to keep silent or reveal the truth and risk a promising political career. I enjoyed the author’s style of writing but I also found in frustrating. Throughout the story the author chose not to reveal certain details in an effort to create mystery but it gave me the feeling the reader was unworthy of important information. The story is narrated by the unbalanced father of one of the boys and the crime is just a backdrop to explore this troubling character and his influence. Perhaps if this storyline was more thoroughly explored, it may have been more intriguing. As it was, it left me unfulfilled.
Date published: 2013-04-07
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Dinner could not end soon enough The premise of this book was intriguing, but it in no way lived up to its hype. The narrator was frustrating and irritating. The littlest things annoyed him and sent him off on a tangent, which was the author's way of revealing details of the mystery we spend the dinner unravelling. The mystery itself was disturbing, and revealed entirely too slowly and cluttered with too much extraneous information. I literally couldn't wait for this dinner to end. I'm barely glad to have read this one, and more thankful to have simply gotten through it.
Date published: 2013-03-31
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Meh This book really wasn't as amazing as Chapters had advertised it to be. It certainly was NOT comparable to Gone Girl. I do feel that the story was interesting, but the narrative was tiring and the main character frustrating. I finished it just for the sake of finishing it.
Date published: 2013-03-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Unforgetable Unravelling of Secrets Excellent story that takes place all during one dinner between two brothers and their wives. As the dinner unfolds, past and present disturbing secrets and events they have been hiding are slowly revealed. The memorable, disturbing ending will be hard to put out of my mind.
Date published: 2013-03-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Shocking family evening Divided into the five parts of a dinner, the novel starts by slowly telling the story of two brothers and their wives having dinner in a hip and chic restaurant in the Netherlands. Based on this premise, the narrative, given here by one of the brothers (Paul), seems quite simple if not common. Until, the dinner reaches its climax and we learn the true reason behind this family reunion: the sons of brothers Paul and Serge have committed what Minny in “The Help” would qualify as a “terrible awful”. As the extent and consequences of this “terrible awful” are revealed, the parents argue on how they should react and how to deal with this matter, even if it means going against all moral principals ... even the law. The book format plays here a good part in my appraisal of it. Paul’s first-person narrative is easily readable and intelligent. Moreover, Paul’s monologue is brutally honest in the description he makes of his son’s and nephew’s terrible act but also of who he is as an individual and how he might inadvertently have influenced this act. Another good point in its favor (and also the main reason why this is not a book you should read lightly) is that the author’s aim here is not the obvious moral and ethic response we would have at first expected. The author is here shocking, if not provoking, in the lack of moral compass his characters depict. The solutions they envision to settle the “terrible awful” here lack even the basic legal ethic. As you go through an array of emotions that span from disbelief and lack of understanding to anger and rage at the injustice that is openly displayed, it becomes impossible to put the book down for good and leave the story unfinished. In fact, you feel quite compelled to return to its pages in order to discover what the final outcome will be or how the whole matter will unravel. Because even though this novel is frightening, shocking, provoking and even disturbing in its depiction of the immorality some people may show towards the legal and ethic system in place, we can’t keep away from asking ourselves just how far we would be willing to go to protect the people that are dearest to us. Whether you will read this book and experience pleasure or disgust is entirely up to you. The only sure thing is that it is bound to leave a lasting feeling on anyone who reads it. For more on this book and others, visit my blog at ladybugandotherbookworms.blogspot.com
Date published: 2013-03-12
Rated out of 5 by from I now understand the hype! Very interesting narrative from the perspective of a very different kind of character. I am not sure how to describe this book other than it was a very hard book to put down.
Date published: 2013-03-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Book Review from The Bibliotaphe Closet: The Dinner by Herman Koch The Dinner by Herman Koch begins deceptively reasonable in its act of “normalcy” by its introduction of one of the book’s characters, Serge Lohman, a cabinet minister running in an election, his wife Babette, and its talk of what many families and couples enjoy — a night out to dinner. The first-person narrative shared by the main character of the book, Paul, is easily readable, intelligent, and brutally honest that readers can enjoy being pulled into the fabric of the story with ease and interest. But as the story continues, the “horrific act” committed by both of the couples’ sons is revealed, and not only triggers a city-wide police investigation, but leaves the readers with the shocking anger of its injustice. While not discounting the severity of the crime itself because juvenile delinquency exists in the everyday of community, the book does delve deeper in revealing an even more shocking immorality — the response and reaction of the boys’ parents. And from there the book spirals into a gripping narrative of subversive violence. While Serge Lohman is accused of a pompous, egocentric attitude; his wife, Babette, portrayed as a weeping socialite; Claire, an intelligent and doting mother; and Paul, a complacent father with deep-rooted insecurity issues — readers will be shocked to learn the true culprits and puppeteers of violence and immorality in the book. I, myself, had to put the book down several times to take in a breath from my anger and disbelief. And yet, I was compelled to return to it in order to complete the book and discover its outcome. The tension in the book coupled with its shock value as well as the fact that it’s so well-written and easily readable makes this novel a tough story to put down. It will certainly make readers question just how far one would and should go in protecting those they love—and how far back the source goes in perpetuating acts of violence, as well as who is truly to blame. The novel is an enjoyable read as it is a frightening, disturbing one; one that readers will abhor in its immoral compass and delight in, in its provocative and succinctly dark grip. If you haven’t yet had the pleasure (and the disgust) of reading the novel, The Dinner, by Herman Koch, it’s one you’ll want to add to—and devour from—your reading menu.
Date published: 2013-03-01
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not one to read lightly Herman Koch somehow pulled this reluctant reader all the way to the last page of his disturbing novel. Not a book where, if you hate it, you can skip to the last pages and be done with it. Both Koch and his translator are very good at their craft. Two brothers and their wives, influential, wealthy, dine together in order to feel each other out about the horrid situation their sons have created. Their solutions are plausible, hopefully not probable, and very unsettling. I kind of wish I hadn't read it.
Date published: 2013-02-28

– More About This Product –

The Dinner

The Dinner

by Herman Koch

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 420 pages, 8.6 × 5.7 × 1 in

Published: June 26, 2013

Publisher: Thorndike Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1410459292

ISBN - 13: 9781410459299

From the Publisher

On a summer's evening in Amsterdam, two couples meet at a fashionable restaurant for dinner. Between mouthfuls of food, the conversation remains a gentle hum of polite discourse. But behind the empty words, terrible things need to be said. Each couple has a fifteen- year- old son. The boys are united by their accountability for a single horrific act. As civility and friendship disintegrate, both couples show just how far they will go to protect those they love.

About the Author

Herman Koch was born in Arnhem, Netherlands on September 5, 1953. He is a writer and actor. His written works include De Voorbijganger; Red Ons, Maria Montenelli; Eten Met Emma; and Denken aan Bruce Kennedy. The Dinner won the Publieksprijs Prize in 2009. He is an actor for radio, television, and film. He co-created the long-running TV series Jiskefet, which ran from 1990 to 2005.