The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom by Robert A. LevyThe Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom by Robert A. Levy

The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom

byRobert A. Levy, William Mellor

Paperback | January 16, 2010

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The Founding Fathers wanted the judicial branch to serve as a check on the power of the legislative and executive, and gave the Supreme Court the responsibility of interpreting the Constitution in a way that would safeguard individual freedoms. Sadly, the Supreme Court has handed down many destructive decisions on cases you probably never learned about in school. In The Dirty Dozen, two distinguished legal scholars shed light on the twelve worst cases, which allowed government to interfere in your private contractual agreements; curtail your rights to criticize or support political candidates; arrest and imprison you indefinitely, without filing charges; seize your private property, without compensation, when someone uses the property for criminal activity-even if you don't know about it!
Title:The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded FreedomFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 9.17 × 6.11 × 0.91 inPublished:January 16, 2010Publisher:Cato InstituteLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1935308270

ISBN - 13:9781935308270

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Reviews

Rated 1 out of 5 by from Very Political The authors have very right wing views, They are gun advocates and present weak data advocating why people should carry guns. They ignore data from other countries with strict gun control that have far fewer homicides per capita than the US. The authors advocate that the US Constitution is inflexible and is not a living document that can keep pace with the evolution of society.
Date published: 2011-08-16

Editorial Reviews

Levy and Mellor offer fascinating insights on twelve of the most important and controversial cases of our time. Readers will gain new appreciation for the Supreme Court's role in affecting their lives and liberties. With that appreciation will come heightened understanding of the stakes in future Supreme Court nominations.