The "discovery" Of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Lessons In The Practice Of Political Medicine

Hardcover | February 1, 1986

byAbraham B. Bergman

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"Historically neither the health care system nor the government knew or wanted to know about SIDS. Bergman, who has worked with parents and with a small number of professionals, was president of the National SIDS Foundation (1972-77), got SIDS research into federal programs, and provided help for bereaved parents--counselling rather than jail. . . . This book is must reading for health care providers and for government health policymakers. It should be in all libraries. Rarely does a book offer so much insight into human need and into political medicine. Highly recommended." Choice "This is a very useful book that describes the valuable contribution that a dedicated public spirited pediatrician can make to promote the health of children in the United States." JAMA

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"Historically neither the health care system nor the government knew or wanted to know about SIDS. Bergman, who has worked with parents and with a small number of professionals, was president of the National SIDS Foundation (1972-77), got SIDS research into federal programs, and provided help for bereaved parents--counselling rather th...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:254 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:February 1, 1986Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275920593

ISBN - 13:9780275920593

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?Historically neither the health care system nor the government knew or wanted to know about SIDS. Bergman, who has worked with parents and with a small number of professionals, was president of the National SIDS Foundation (1972-77), got SIDS research into federal programs, and provided help for bereaved parents--counseling rather than jail. . . . The book focuses on bureaucrats concerned with their own jobs. Bergman names names and hands out praise where due. . . . This book is must reading for health care providers and for government health policymakers. It should be in all libraries. Rarely does a book offer so much insight into human need and into political medicine. Highly recommended.?-Choice