The Divine Comedy: Volume 3: Paradiso

Paperback | December 1, 1961

EditorDante AlighieriTranslated byJohn D. Sinclair

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An invaluable source of pleasure to those English readers who wish to read this great medieval classic with true understanding, Sinclair's three-volume prose translation of Dante's Divine Comedy provides both the original Italian text and the Sinclair translation, arranged on facing pages, andcommentaries, appearing after each canto, which serve as brilliant examples of genuine literary criticism. This volume contains the complete translation of Dante's Paradiso.

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An invaluable source of pleasure to those English readers who wish to read this great medieval classic with true understanding, Sinclair's three-volume prose translation of Dante's Divine Comedy provides both the original Italian text and the Sinclair translation, arranged on facing pages, andcommentaries, appearing after each canto, w...

Dante Alighieri (c. 1265-1321) was an Italian Florentine poet.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:448 pages, 5.31 × 7.91 × 1.18 inPublished:December 1, 1961Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195004140

ISBN - 13:9780195004144

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Customer Reviews of The Divine Comedy: Volume 3: Paradiso

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Pictures Don't Do It Justice Book is much nicer once it is in your hands - the fine leather binding makes it very sophisticated/posh for the home library. Binding has a slight metallic bronze sheen to it. Has all 3 parts of Dante's classic poem.
Date published: 2016-11-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great book for collection. This is a great book for a collection. The book includes fine art work and is a treasure to keep in any library or collection.
Date published: 2014-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Godlike! An awesome piece of work by Dante, it is easily considered to be one of the greatest pieces of poetry in the world, and for great reason. Everything about it is perfect, from the vivid descriptions to the important mixture of pagan and christian doctrines. I recommend this to anyone who seeks a great poetic treat, because this author is a genius
Date published: 2012-01-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Awesome Works Of Dante Dante Alighieri, an Italian man in the 1300s, wrote one of the greatest poetic treatises on Heaven and Hell that has lasted to this day. The Divine Comedy is in three parts, one that details his spiritual travels through Hell, one for Purgatory, and the other that takes him through Heaven, guided always by a figure of legend. In “Inferno,” the poet finds himself lost in dark woods, and though he tries to find his way out, he ultimately meets the ancient poet, Virgil. Virgil explains that in order to reach Paradise, Dante must first follow him on a tour of Hell, and then leads him down through the gates. For Dante, there are nine circles of Hell, each tailored to the sinners who go there. The sixth through the ninth circles have inner levels within each of them, and on the fourth level of the ninth circle of hell (where traitors to their masters reside) he finds Satan himself. The two poets exit Hell in time for the sun’s rising on Easter Sunday, and that is where Virgil leads him on to Purgatory. In this place, Dante is marked with seven P’s for each of the sins, and as they climb, these are removed and the climbing becomes easier. Purgatory, too, is terraced like Hell, but here the sinners could climb higher with proper prayer and repentance measures. There are seven terraces to Purgatory, with their corresponding historical and very real figures, and after the seventh he passed through a wall of fire to be guided in Paradise by his Lady, Beatrice, leaving Virgil behind. To pass through the river Lethe, Dante is told to confess his sins, but he instead faints and is carried across to find Beatrice. He finds Heaven has seven Spheres for each virtue and those who lived them so fully they became inhabitants, then Fixed Stars where many Apostles lived, and finally the ninth heaven allowed him to witness Christ and the Virgin Mary entering and to gaze upon divinity as the angels sang. He’s left alone, though, to be one with God, and has no words to describe the greatness he finds.
Date published: 2009-12-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Really Great The book was extremely well written and it gives a great sense of how Dante viewed the afterlife. The translation of the book was very well done and the end notes allow the reader to fully understand what they are reading and how it relates to the time period in which it was written. I would recommend this book to people who aren’t even religious because it is such an interesting story to read.
Date published: 2007-05-07