The Dramaturgy of Shakespeare's Romances by Barbara MowatThe Dramaturgy of Shakespeare's Romances by Barbara Mowat

The Dramaturgy of Shakespeare's Romances

byBarbara Mowat

Paperback | April 1, 2011

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Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest-three of Shakespeare's final plays diverge from Shakepeare's usual standards. Generically, stylistically, and dramatically, they each embrace hauntingly familiarShakespearean themes and incidents. However, with comic devices colliding with tragic passions, mimetic actions that give way to spectacle, and drama that yields to narrative, everything Shakespearean has undergone a puzzling transformation. Barbara A. Mowat argues that when a dramatist selects a genre, a theatrical style, a narrative or dramatic mode, he is consciously choosing a way of creating a certain kind of experience. Thus, by confronting the comic form with the tragic, the realistic with the artificial, the dramatic with the narrative, Shakespeare makes meaning in a new way. He creates a kind of play that frees romance from the traditional bounds of his early dramas.
Barbara A. Mowat is director of research emerita at the Folger Shakespeare Library, consulting editor of Shakespeare Quarterly, and editor (with Paul Werstine) of the Folger Library Shakespeare editions.
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Title:The Dramaturgy of Shakespeare's RomancesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:176 pages, 9 × 6 × 10 inPublished:April 1, 2011Publisher:University of Georgia PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0820338567

ISBN - 13:9780820338569

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Mowat's suggestive and sensitive treatment of the conflicting aesthetics in the final plays provides vocabulary and viewpoints of great value. She helps us to understand 'how plays work,' not merely as isolated works of art, but as drama that presupposes a living audience.

- H. R. Coursen