The Dutch Republics Of South Africa; Three Letters To R. N. Fowler, And Charles Buxton

Paperback | January 9, 2012

byFrederick William Chesson

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1871. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... great hardships, entered Natal, which was then only colonized by a small settlement of Englishmen. In the following year they were joined by a considerable party, who may now be described as "the main body" of their discontented countrymen. The Dutch were soon strong enough to fight pitched battles with Dingaan, the Zulu king (who had massacred many of their number) ; and ultimately, in concert with Panda, they defeated him, and raised his rival to the throne. Upon their proclaiming a Batavian Republic, the Government of the Cape asserted its authority by force, and a state of civil war ensued. In 1843 the Boers formally surrendered their claim to Natal, and retired over the Drakensberg to the country now known as the Free State. There they united with bodies of their countrymen, who, from about the year 1826, had crossed the Orange River in seasons of drought. Some of the Boers, headed by Mr. Andries Pretorius, proceeded still farther into the interior, crossed the Vaal River, and took possession of the territory now known as the TransVaal Republic. But the Imperial Government did not cease to regard them as British subjects, although it was not till 1848 that they were actually compelled to submit to the authority of the Governor of the Cape Colony. In that year Sir Harry Smith proclaimed the Queen's sovereignty over the Orange River territory. The Committee of the Privy Council, in their report dated the 5th July, 1850, justifythat act in these terms:--" In 1836 the emigrant Boers settled "themselves down in many parts of what is now called the Orange "sovereignty; they assumed absolute independence; established "a species of government for themselves; disputed native titles to "land; disclaimed being amenable to any native jurisdiction, "even when w...

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1871. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... great hardships, entered Natal, which was then only colonized by a small settlement of Englishmen. In the following year the...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:26 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.05 inPublished:January 9, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:021758280X

ISBN - 13:9780217582803

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