The Duty Of The Free States; Or, Remarks Suggested By The Case Of The Creole

Paperback | February 7, 2012

byWilliam Ellery Channing

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1842 Excerpt: ... millions who are in bondage with the passion for escape; would not society be convulsed to its centre? and who of us could avert the terrible crimes which would be perpetrated in the name of liberty? No. Earnestly as I oppose slavery, I deprecate all interference with the slave within the jurisdiction of the Slave-holding States. I will plead his cause with whatever strength God has given me. But I can do no more. God forbid that I should work out his deliverance by force and blood. These remarks are the more important, because there seem to be growing up among us looser ideas than formerly prevailed on the subject of inciting the slaves to vindicate their rights. The common language leads to error. We are told, and told truly, that the slave-holder has no property in the man whom he oppresses; that the slave has a right to immediate freedom; and the inference, which some make, is, that the slave is authorized to use, without regard to consequences, the means of emancipation. The next inference is, that he is to be urged and aided to break his chain. But these views are too sweeping, and need important modifications. The slave has a right to liberty; but a right does not imply that it may be asserted by any and every means. There is a great law of humanity to which all are subject, the bond as well as the free, and which we must never lose sight of in redressing wrongs, or in claiming and insisting on our due. The slave cannot innocently adopt any and every expedient for vindicating his liberty. He is bound to waive his right, if in maintaining it he is to violate the. law of humanity, and to spread general ruin. Were I confined unjustly to a house, I should have no right to free myself by setting it on fire, if thereby a family should be destroyed. An impr...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1842 Excerpt: ... millions who are in bondage with the passion for escape; would not society be convulsed to its centre? and who of us could avert...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:40 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.08 inPublished:February 7, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217951600

ISBN - 13:9780217951609

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