The Economics Of Screening And Risk Sharing In Higher Education: Human Capital Formation, Income…

Paperback | April 21, 2015

byBernhard Eckwert, Itzhak ZilchaEditorBernhard Eckwert

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The Economics of Screening and Risk Sharing in Higher Education explores advances in information technologies and in statistical and social sciences that have significantly improved the reliability of techniques for screening large populations. These advances are important for higher education worldwide because they affect many of the mechanisms commonly used for rationing the available supply of educational services. Using a single framework to study several independent questions, the authors provide a comprehensive theory in an empirically-driven field. Their answers to questions about funding structures for investments in higher education, students attitudes towards risk, and the availability of arrangements for sharing individual talent risks are important for understanding the theoretical underpinnings of information and uncertainty on human capital formation. Investigates conditions under which better screening leads to desirable outcomes such as higher human capital accumulation, less income inequality, and higher economic well-being. Questions how the role of screening relates to the funding structure for investments in higher education and to the availability of risk sharing arrangements for individual talent risks. Reveals government policies that are suited for controlling or counteracting detrimental side effects along the growth path.

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From the Publisher

The Economics of Screening and Risk Sharing in Higher Education explores advances in information technologies and in statistical and social sciences that have significantly improved the reliability of techniques for screening large populations. These advances are important for higher education worldwide because they affect many of the ...

From the Jacket

The Economics of Screening and Risk Sharing in Higher Educationexplores advances in information technologies and in statistical and social sciences that have significantly improved the reliability of techniques for screening large populations. These advances are important for higher education worldwide because they affect many of the m...

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Eckwert is chair of the Economics Department at Bielefeld University. He has published on the theory of capital markets, the economics of information, and endogenous growth in journals such as European Economic Review, Economica, and the Journal of Economic Dynamics and ControlItzhak Zilcha works on problems in human...
Format:PaperbackDimensions:190 pages, 8.75 × 6.35 × 0.68 inPublished:April 21, 2015Publisher:Academic PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0128031905

ISBN - 13:9780128031902

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

1 Uncertainty and Screening: Preliminary Notions
2 Screening Information in Equilibrium
3 Screening and Economic Growth
4 Higher Education Financing
5 The Role of Government in Financing Higher Education
6 Screening and Income Inequality

Editorial Reviews

"Recent economic conditions and predictions have increased interest in the analysis of higher education finance, provision, and allocation. This timely book presents a rigorous theoretical analysis tackling two key issues, and is a valuable resource for both experienced and aspiring researchers."  --Sinan Sarpça, Koç University "This book offers a unique comprehensive analysis of the use of screening techniques for admission to higher education. It develops rigorous theoretical insights to address a highly relevant issue in policy which carries huge potential implications for human capital accumulation, the allocation of talents, and income inequality."  --Graziella Bertocchi, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia "This is a beautiful work, a pleasure to read. With MOOCs, reduced government support, and worsening income distribution, concern about how students are sorted among institutions of higher education is rising. To address the effect of universities' ability to process more information about students, Eckwert and Zilcha devise a general equilibrium sorting model , more technically sophisticated than the usual partial equilibrium approach but also more relevant for policy.  There are analogies between what they do for higher education and what others have done to model health insurance, where welfare can also be reduced by improved information."  --David Denslow, University of Florida