The Elements of Academic Style: Writing for the Humanities

Paperback | August 26, 2014

byEric Hayot

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Eric Hayot teaches graduate students and faculty in literary and cultural studies how to think and write like a professional scholar. From granular concerns, such as sentence structure and grammar, to big-picture issues, such as adhering to genre patterns for successful research and publishing and developing productive and rewarding writing habits, Hayot helps ambitious students, newly minted Ph.D.'s, and established professors shape their work and develop their voices.

Hayot does more than explain the techniques of academic writing. He aims to adjust the writer's perspective, encouraging scholars to think of themselves as makers and doers of important work. Scholarly writing can be frustrating and exhausting, yet also satisfying and crucial, and Hayot weaves these experiences, including his own trials and tribulations, into an ethos for scholars to draw on as they write. Combining psychological support with practical suggestions for composing introductions and conclusions, developing a schedule for writing, using notes and citations, and structuring paragraphs and essays, this guide to the elements of academic style does its part to rejuvenate scholarship and writing in the humanities.

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From the Publisher

Eric Hayot teaches graduate students and faculty in literary and cultural studies how to think and write like a professional scholar. From granular concerns, such as sentence structure and grammar, to big-picture issues, such as adhering to genre patterns for successful research and publishing and developing productive and rewarding w...

Eric Hayot is professor of comparative literature and Asian studies at the Pennsylvania State University. He is the author of On Literary Worlds, The Hypothetical Mandarin: Sympathy, Modernity, and Chinese Pain (co-recipient of the 2010 Modernist Studies Association Book Prize), and Chinese Dreams: Pound, Brecht, Tel quel. He has work...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:August 26, 2014Publisher:Columbia University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0231168012

ISBN - 13:9780231168014

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Table of Contents

1. Why Read This Book?Part I. Writing as Practice2. Unlearning What You (Probably) Know3. Eight Strategies for Getting Writing Done4. Institutional Contexts5. Dissertations and Books6. A Materialist Theory of Writing7. How Do Readers Work?Part II. Strategy8. The Uneven U9. Structure and Subordination10. Structural Rhythm11. Introductions12. Don't Say It All Early13. Paragraphing14. Three Types of Transitions15. Showing Your Iceberg16. Metalanguage17. Ending Well18. Titles and SubtitlesPart III. Tactics19. Citational Practice20. Conference Talks21. Examples22. Figural Language23. Footnotes and Endnotes24. Jargon25. Parentheticals26. Pronouns27. Repetition28. Rhetorical Questions and Clauses29. Sentence Rhythm30. Ventilation31. WeightPart IV. Becoming32. Work as Process33. Becoming a Writer34. From the Workshop to the World (as Workshop [as World])35. AcknowledgmentsAppendix: A Writer's WorkbookWorks CitedBibliography

Editorial Reviews

Excellent.... The book is a comprehensive, incisive, and staggeringly overdue guide to writing humanistic scholarship.... Written in assured, engaging prose, possessed of personality but not overbearing, The Elements should be required reading for everybody-students, faculty, even administrators-in the orbit of a humanities Ph.D. program.