The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Choson Korea by Jisoo M. KimThe Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Choson Korea by Jisoo M. Kim

The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Choson Korea

byJisoo M. Kim

Hardcover | November 9, 2015

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The Choson state (1392?1910) is typically portrayed as a rigid society because of its hereditary status system, slavery, and Confucian gender norms. However, The Emotions of Justice reveals a surprisingly complex picture of a judicial system that operated in a contradictory fashion by discriminating against subjects while simultaneously minimizing such discrimination. Jisoo Kim contends that the state?s recognition of won, or the sense of being wronged, permitted subjects of different genders or statuses to interact in the legal realm and in doing so illuminates the intersection of law, emotions, and gender in premodern Korea.

Jisoo M. Kim is Korea Foundation Assistant Professor of History, International Affairs, and East Asian Languages and Literatures at George Washington University.
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Title:The Emotions of Justice: Gender, Status, and Legal Performance in Choson KoreaFormat:HardcoverDimensions:224 pages, 9.3 × 6.3 × 0.85 inPublished:November 9, 2015Publisher:University Of Washington PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295995033

ISBN - 13:9780295995038

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The Choson state (1392?1910) is typically portrayed as a rigid society because of its hereditary status system, slavery, and Confucian gender norms. However, The Emotions of Justice reveals a surprisingly complex picture of a judicial system that operated in a contradictory fashion by discriminating against subjects while simultaneously minimizing such discrimination. Jisoo Kim contends that the state?s recognition of won, or the sense of being wronged, permitted subjects of different genders or statuses to interact in the legal realm and in doing so illuminates the intersection of law, emotions, and gender in premodern Korea.The Emotions of Justice is well written . . . [and] provides an illuminating analysis of the relationship between the state and its subjects before the modern era. This is a sophisticated addition to our understanding of gender roles in Choson. - Donald Baker, University of British Columbia