The Empress, the Queen, and the Nun: Women and Power at the Court of Philip III of Spain by Magdalena S. SánchezThe Empress, the Queen, and the Nun: Women and Power at the Court of Philip III of Spain by Magdalena S. Sánchez

The Empress, the Queen, and the Nun: Women and Power at the Court of Philip III of Spain

byMagdalena S. Sánchez

Paperback | June 14, 2002

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In the early seventeenth-century, when Spanish interests often competed with those of the House of Austria, three women in the court of Philip III of Spain—Empress María, Philip's grandmother; Margaret of Austria, Philip's wife; and Margaret of the Cross, Philip's aunt—worked behind the scenes to win favor for the causes of the Austrian Habsburgs.

In The Empress, the Queen, and the Nun, historian Magdalena Sánchez offers an intriguing examination of the political power wielded by these three women. Sánchez examines the ways that women used religious piety, childbearing, illnesses such as melancholy, and marriage arrangements to sway political decisions. They employed distinct strategies and languages at informal occasions such as meals, masquerade celebrations, and religious ceremonies to influence the political scene. By incorporating women into informal political networks, this work breaks new ground in the study of early modern European politics.

Magdalena Sánchez is an associate professor of history at Gettysburg College.
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Title:The Empress, the Queen, and the Nun: Women and Power at the Court of Philip III of SpainFormat:PaperbackDimensions:296 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.72 inPublished:June 14, 2002Publisher:Johns Hopkins University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:080187243X

ISBN - 13:9780801872433

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Editorial Reviews

Sanchez's portrayal of court politics is convincing and solidly documented, and it broadens our understanding of not only a little-studied and often-derided reign but also the hidden logics of a crucial political institution, the court, in a period of transition toward government by royal favorites.