The End Of Empire: Dependencies Since 1948 Part 1: The West Indies, British Honduras, Hong Kong…

Hardcover | August 1, 2000

EditorFrederick MaddenbyA. F. Madden

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The eighth volume in Frederick Madden's monumental documentary history of the British Empire, this volume deals with some of the dependencies--the West Indies, British Honduras, Hong Kong, Fiji, Cyprus, Gibraltar and the Falklands--since 1948. Using documentary materials, as in the earlier volumes, the book illustrates the progress toward self-government and independence, including, for instance, the development of communal tensions in Cyprus and the de facto division of the island, and the handing back of Hong Kong to China. The volume also includes Madden's valedictory summary and overview of the evolution of imperial government in the dependencies covered in these volumes, beginning with the Anglo-Norman empire of the 12th century. Along with the earlier volumes, this book provides a valuable resource for researchers interested in British imperialism.

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The eighth volume in Frederick Madden's monumental documentary history of the British Empire, this volume deals with some of the dependencies--the West Indies, British Honduras, Hong Kong, Fiji, Cyprus, Gibraltar and the Falklands--since 1948. Using documentary materials, as in the earlier volumes, the book illustrates the progress tow...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:600 pages, 9.56 × 6.5 × 1.33 inPublished:August 1, 2000Publisher:Greenwood PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313290725

ISBN - 13:9780313290725

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?[a]n invaluable collection of constitutional documents spanning the twelfth to the twentieth centuries. In fact, these volumes represent a lifetime's achievement by one of the key members of the "Oxford school.,.".[P]rofessor Madden must be congratulated on what is his life's work, for it complements and enhances our knowledge of British decolonization and the emerging British Commonwealth. And who knows, in this increasingly unsettled world of ours, historians may come to full circle and once again "rediscover" the benefits of a holistic approach to the discipline of British imperial history.??Canadian Journal of History