The End Of The Line: Lost Jobs, New Lives in Postindustrial America by Kathryn Marie DudleyThe End Of The Line: Lost Jobs, New Lives in Postindustrial America by Kathryn Marie Dudley

The End Of The Line: Lost Jobs, New Lives in Postindustrial America

byKathryn Marie Dudley

Paperback | June 23, 1997

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The End of the Line tells the story of the 1988 closing of the Chrysler assembly plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Kathryn Marie Dudley uses interviews with residents to chart the often confusing process of change that deindustrialization forced on every corner of the community. This honest, moving portrait of one town's radical shift from a manufacturing to a postindustrial economy will redefine the way Americans think about our families, communities, and future.

"An excellent study not only of the cultural disruptions caused by the shutdown of Chrysler's operations in Kenosha, Wisconsin, but also of the ideology of progress that abetted the shutdown."—Stephen Amberg, Industrial and Labor Relations Review

"With the eye of an anthropologist, [Dudley] examines the tensions between the 'culture of hands' and the 'culture of mind.' Her account is especially instructive because, by many measures, Kenosha has successfully recovered, yet for many the pain still remains."—Booklist

"Exceptional. . . . Should be widely read."—Douglas Harper, Contemporary Sociology

"Make[s] clear what a tenuous concept economic security is, especially when the rules for achieving security are in flux."—Barbara Presley Noble, New York Times

About The Author

Kathryn Marie Dudley is assistant professor of American studies and anthropology at Yale University.
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Details & Specs

Title:The End Of The Line: Lost Jobs, New Lives in Postindustrial AmericaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:250 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.8 inPublished:June 23, 1997Publisher:University Of Chicago Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0226169103

ISBN - 13:9780226169101

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Tradition of Opportunity
Part One: What Happened to the American Dream?
1. Kenosha Had a Dream
2. Keep Kenosha Open!
3. Dollars and Diplomas
Part Two: Culture of the Mind
4. Turning the Tables
5. Social Darwinism Revisited
6. That Haunting Thing
Part Three: Culture of the Hands
7. Shopfloor Culture
8. Badges of Ability
9. Broken Promises
10. Mapping the Moral Terrain
Conclusion: American Primitive
Appendix: The Kenosha Workforce
Notes
Index

From Our Editors

An evocative and powerful portrait of America in transition, The End of the Line tells the story of what the 1988 closing of the Chrysler assembly plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin, meant to the people who lived in that company town. Since the early days of the twentieth century, Kenosha had forged its identity and politics around the interests of the auto industry. When nearly six thousand workers lost their jobs in the shutdown, the community faced not only a serious economic crisis but also a profound moral one. In this innovative study, Dudley describes the painful, often confusing process of change that residents of Kenosha, like the increasing number of Americans who are caught in the crossfire of deindustrialization, were forced to undergo. Through interviews with displaced autoworkers and Kenosha's community leaders, high-school counselors, and a rising class of upwardly mobile professionals, Dudley dramatizes the lessons Kenoshans drew from the plant shutdown. When economic forces intrude on our lives, the resulting changes in earning power, status, and access