The End by Fernanda TorresThe End by Fernanda Torres

The End

byFernanda TorresTranslated byAlison Entrekin

Paperback | July 11, 2017

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In this deadly-funny debut novel by renowned Brazilian actress Fernanda Torres, five macho friends in Rio’s Copacabana reflect on their hedonistic glory days—now supplanted by the indignities of aging—in what turn out to be their final moments.

With uncanny insight into the less virtuous corners of the male psyche, Fernanda Torres brings us five friends who once milked the high life of Rio’s Bossa Nova age and are now left with memories—parties, marriages, divorces, fixations, inhibitions, bad decisions—and the grim realities of getting old. Álvaro lives alone and bemoans the evils of his ex-wife. Sílvio can’t give up the excesses of sex and drugs. Ribeiro is a vain, Viagra-abusing beach bum. Neto is the square, a faithful husband until the end. Ciro is the Don Juan envied by all—but the first to die. Cutting in on these swan songs are the testimonies of those the men seduced, cheated, loved, and abandoned: their wives and children. Edgy, funny, and wise, The End is a candid tropical tragicomedy and an epitaph for a lost generation of machos.
Fernanda Torres was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1965. She is an actress and writer. She has enjoyed a successful career in the theatre, cinema and on television for thirty-five years and has received many awards, including Best Actress at the 1986 Cannes Film Festival. She is a columnist for the newspaper Folha de São Paulo and the magaz...
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Title:The EndFormat:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 7.12 × 5 × 0.6 inPublished:July 11, 2017Publisher:Restless BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:163206121X

ISBN - 13:9781632061218

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Torres’s darkly humorous first novel conjures a unique time in Brazilian history through a clever narrative conceit and vividly portrayed characters.”

    —Cortney Ophoff, Booklist