The English Language In Its Elements And Forms; With A History Of Its Origin And Development Designed For Use In Colleges And Schools by William Chauncey Fowler

The English Language In Its Elements And Forms; With A History Of Its Origin And Development…

byWilliam Chauncey Fowler

Paperback | January 8, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1850. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... 2. She is the same lady that I saw yesterday. C. S. 3. The convention that assembled yesterday has been dissolved. C. S. 4. "Who that hopes to succeed would venture on an expedient like this? C. S. 5. The soldiers and tents that we saw yesterday. C. S. 6. All men that are fond of pleasure. C. S. Give equivalents of the preceding examples in this section. § 504. He was the first that died. He was the wisest that Athens produced. § 505. Rule XXVHI.--He that wrote the Declaration of Independence, and who was the third President of the United States. F. S. § 506. Rule XXIX.--He saw what had been done. C. S. Note 1. Thus, what with war, and what with sweat, what with the gallows, and what with poverty, I am custom shrunk. C. S. 2. He did not say but what he did it. F. S. If a man read little, he had need to have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. F. S. 3. What! can you lull the winged winds asleep? C. S. 4. On what side soever I turn my eyes. C. S. 6. Whither when they come, they fell at words Whether of them should be the Lord of lords. C. S. Rule XXX.--Who discovered America? Columbus. C. S. Rule XXXI.--They faithfully sought each other. C. S. Rule XXXII.--One might travel two miles in that time. C 8. CHAPTER V. SYNTAX OF THE VERB. § 507. Rule XXXIII.--The Verb agrees with its SubjectNominative in Number and Person; as, "I write;" "thou rulest;" "he obeys." Whenever a Single subject is spoken of, the verb is put in the Singular number. Where more subjects than ono are spoken of, the verb is put in the Plural number. Where a person speaks of himself, the verb is in the First person Singular. Where a person speaks to another person, the verb is in the Second person Singular. Where a person speaks of another person, or of any ...

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Title:The English Language In Its Elements And Forms; With A History Of Its Origin And Development…Format:PaperbackDimensions:210 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.44 inPublished:January 8, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217797989

ISBN - 13:9780217797986

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