The Enormous Vogue Of Things Mexican: Cultural Relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935 by Helen DelparThe Enormous Vogue Of Things Mexican: Cultural Relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935 by Helen Delpar

The Enormous Vogue Of Things Mexican: Cultural Relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920…

byHelen Delpar

Paperback | December 30, 1995

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Beginning about 1900 the expanded international role of
the United States brought increased attention to the cultures of other
peoples and a growth of interest in Latin America. The Enormous Vogue of
Things Mexican traces the evolution of cultural relations between the United
States and Mexico from 1920 to 1935, identifying the individuals, institutions,
and themes that made up this fascinating chapter in the history of the
two countries.

Title:The Enormous Vogue Of Things Mexican: Cultural Relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920…Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 9 × 6 × 1 inPublished:December 30, 1995Publisher:University Of Alabama Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0817308113

ISBN - 13:9780817308117

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From Our Editors

The histories of Mexico and the United States have been intertwined since the beginning of their existence as independent nations. Diplomatic relations were established in 1822 and were maintained despite occasional ruptures, and economic links were forged early in the 19th century and became increasingly important with the passage of time. Beginning about 1900 the expanded international role of the United States brought increased attention to the cultures of other peoples, and an important aspect of this international awareness was a growth of interest in Latin America. By 1910, Spanish language classes were offered in American secondary schools, and because of substantial economic investments the American community in Mexico consisted of nearly 21,000 residents. Reviewing two books with Mexican themes in 1929, Waldo Frank saw them as heralds of "a campaign of esthetic, emotional, intellectual infiltration" of the United States by Mexico. Frank was referring to a flowering of cultural relations between the United States and Mexico that began in the 1920s and matu

Editorial Reviews

"Required reading for all serious students of Mexican-American relations."
—The Journal of American History