The Environmental Protection Agency: Asking the Wrong Questions: From Nixon to Clinton by Marc K. LandyThe Environmental Protection Agency: Asking the Wrong Questions: From Nixon to Clinton by Marc K. Landy

The Environmental Protection Agency: Asking the Wrong Questions: From Nixon to Clinton

byMarc K. Landy, Marc J. Roberts, Stephen R. Thomas

Paperback | July 1, 1995

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Expanded to cover the Bush administration and the beginnings of the Clinton administration, this exploration of one of the most critical problems of modern government and democratic politics is now more timely than ever. Through careful analysis of representative cases, it evaluates theEnvironmental Protection Agency's performance over its entire existence, uncovers the mistaken premises that have clouded and distorted debate about environmental policy, and shows how public officials might better preserve and promote constitutional democracy.
Marc K. Landy is at Boston College. Marc J. Roberts is at Harvard School of Public Health and the Kennedy School of Government.
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Title:The Environmental Protection Agency: Asking the Wrong Questions: From Nixon to ClintonFormat:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 6.1 × 9.25 × 1.1 inPublished:July 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195086732

ISBN - 13:9780195086737

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction2. The Origins and Development of the Environmental Protection Agency3. Revising the Ozone Standard4. Writing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Regulations5. Passing Superfund6. Forging a Cancer Policy: The Interagency Regulatory Liaison7. The Steel Industry and Enforcing the Clean Air Act8. The Reagan Administration9. The Bush and Clinton Administrations10. Conclusions

From Our Editors

Through careful analysis of representative cases, it evaluates the Environmental Protection Agency's performance over its entire existence, uncovers the mistaken premises that have clouded and distorted debate about environmental policy, and shows how public officials might better preserve and promote constitutional democracy.

Editorial Reviews

"Privileged access to senior EPA officials and candid interviews have provided an insider's view, rich with details of conflict."--Choice