The Environmental Psychology of Prisons and Jails: Creating Humane Spaces in Secure Settings by Richard E. WenerThe Environmental Psychology of Prisons and Jails: Creating Humane Spaces in Secure Settings by Richard E. Wener

The Environmental Psychology of Prisons and Jails: Creating Humane Spaces in Secure Settings

byRichard E. Wener

Hardcover | June 18, 2012

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This book distills thirty years of research on the impacts of jail and prison environments. The research program began with evaluations of new jails that were created by the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, which had a novel design intended to provide a nontraditional and safe environment for pretrial inmates, and documented the stunning success of these jails in reducing tension and violence. This book uses assessments of this new model as a basis for considering the nature of environment and behavior in correctional settings, and more broadly in all human settings. It provides a critical review of research on jail environments and of specific issues critical to the way they are experienced and places them in historical and theoretical context. It presents a contextual model for the way environment influences the chance of violence.
Title:The Environmental Psychology of Prisons and Jails: Creating Humane Spaces in Secure SettingsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:314 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.91 inPublished:June 18, 2012Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521452767

ISBN - 13:9780521452762

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Table of Contents

Foreword; Part I. Overview: History of Correctional Design, Development, and Implementation of Direct Supervision as an Innovation: 1. Introduction; 2. Historical view; 3. The development of direct supervision as a design and management system; 4. Post occupancy evaluations of the earliest DS jails; 5. Effectiveness of direct supervision models; Part II. Environment-Behavior Issues in Corrections: 6. Correctional space and behavior; 7. Prison crowding; 8. The psychology of isolation in prison settings; 9. The effects of noise in correctional settings; 10. Windows, light, nature, and color; Part III. A Model and Conclusions: 11. An environmental and contextual model of violence in jails and prisons; 12. Conclusion.

Editorial Reviews

"...How do prisons and jails shape their occupants? Until now, this reasonable question has rarely been subjected to broad analysis. Wener (environmental psychology, Polytechnic Institute of New York Univ.) has studied correctional buildings for three decades and has had a role in a new form of prison design called direct supervision (DS).... discusses such environmental prison issues as noise, light, access to nature, and the effects of isolation.... Recommended..." --R. D. McCrie, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY, Choice