The Establishment Of Modern English Prose In The Reformation And The Enlightenment by Ian RobinsonThe Establishment Of Modern English Prose In The Reformation And The Enlightenment by Ian Robinson

The Establishment Of Modern English Prose In The Reformation And The Enlightenment

byIan Robinson

Hardcover | January 28, 1999

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Ian Robinson traces the legacy of prose writing as a form theorized and propagated as an art distinct from verse. Engaging with histories of rhetoric as well as the work of the great prose writers in English, Robinson provides a bold reappraisal of this literary form, and shows that the formal construct of the sentence itself is historically conditioned and no older than the post-medieval world. The relationship between rhetorical style and literary meaning, Robinson argues, is at the heart of the way we understand the external world.
Title:The Establishment Of Modern English Prose In The Reformation And The EnlightenmentFormat:HardcoverDimensions:236 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:January 28, 1999Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521480884

ISBN - 13:9780521480888

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Table of Contents

1. Sentence and period; 2. Prose rhythm; 3. Syntax and period in Middle English; 4. Cranmer's commonwealth; 5. Shakespeare vs the Wanderers; 6. Dryden's democracy; 7. The prose world; Appendices.

From Our Editors

Using the histories of rhetoric and works of great prose writers in English, The Establishment of Modern English Prose in the Reformation and the Enlightenment offers a bold reappraisal of prose writing and traces its legacy as a form theorized and promoted as an art distinct from verse. Ian Robinson shows that the formal construct of the sentence itself is historically conditioned and no older than the post-medieval world. At the same time, he argues that the relationship between rhetorical style and literary meaning forms the basis on which we understand the external world.