The Etchingham Letters

Paperback | February 3, 2012

bySir Frederick Pollock

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898. Excerpt: ... XXII. From Miss Elizabeth Etchingham, 83 Hans Place, to Sir Richard Etchingham, Tolcarne. Good morning, Dickory. How do you find yourself to-day? Well, I trust. You need never trouble to be ill, thank you. Illness is a grave fault and one it would go against my conscience to tolerate in you for a moment unless it gave me the chance of keeping my hand in as sick nurse. And of me in that capacity you had best beware. I should treat you very harshly, forcing a new-old book upon you every, day and refusing, without consulting the patient, all garden-party invitations that the Bucklands might afford. Ordination only should compel male attendance at a garden-party. Have you ever noticed the sown broadcast smile--pathetic almost in its want of focus and concentration--which the typical clergy assume at a gardenparty? Why are tiresome Mrs. Mammon people even yet more tiresome and impossible when under a tree than when under a roof? Is failure to adjust themselves to environment at the root of it? And does a garden full of women in gardenparty attire vaguely expressing admiration for their hostess's shrubberies and flower-beds make you long to hybernate? It does me. First Person Represented: "What a charming effect: pink geranium and white viola. I wish my gardener, &c., &c." Second Person Represented (languidly and with eyes at the back of her head, as otherwise the charming effect has not come into her line of vision): "Very, very charming. Mrs. Bowanbore has such exquisite taste. Everything is so perfectly kept. (With sudden vivacity) Oh, Mrs. Bowanbore, we were just saying, &c., &c." Richard, how deadly, deadly dull to hear people applaud what they don't admire. Please I will fall asleep and dream of something real till they have quite done. Would you have me ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898. Excerpt: ... XXII. From Miss Elizabeth Etchingham, 83 Hans Place, to Sir Richard Etchingham, Tolcarne. Good morning, Dickory. How do you fi...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:74 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.15 inPublished:February 3, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217348521

ISBN - 13:9780217348522

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