The Evolution of English Prose, 1700-1800: Style, Politeness, and Print Culture by Carey McIntoshThe Evolution of English Prose, 1700-1800: Style, Politeness, and Print Culture by Carey McIntosh

The Evolution of English Prose, 1700-1800: Style, Politeness, and Print Culture

byCarey McIntosh

Paperback | October 20, 2005

Pricing and Purchase Info

$41.56 online 
$50.95 list price save 18%
Earn 208 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

At the beginning of the eighteenth century ordinary written English was close to speech; by 1800, people expressed themselves more formally, politely, and precisely. The new "writtenness" of prose coincided with the development of a mature print culture, the rise of women writers, the invention of prescriptive grammars, and a powerful new rhetoric. Carey McIntosh traces these changes and illustrates them with comparisons of work by Defoe and Paine, Swift and Burke, Addison and Johnson, Shaftesbury and Godwin, and Astell and Wollstonecraft.
Title:The Evolution of English Prose, 1700-1800: Style, Politeness, and Print CultureFormat:PaperbackDimensions:292 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:October 20, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521021545

ISBN - 13:9780521021548

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Preface; 1. The ordering of English; 2. Literacy and politeness: the gentrification of English prose; 3. Testing the model; 4. Loose and periodic sentences; 5. Lofty language and low; 6. Nominal and oral styles: Johnson and Richardson; 7. The new rhetoric of 1748-93; 8. The instruments of literacy; 9. Politeness; feminisation; 10. Style and rhetoric; Epilogue - language change.

Editorial Reviews

"Carey McIntosh's assertive, intelligent, wide-ranging, and free-wheeling new book should prove important, as well as fascinating, to scholars investigating the language, especially literary language, of eighteenth-century Britain...Any student of the eighteenth century of any sort would find this book both useful and immensely interesting. His theses are possible, plausible, well argued. McIntosh's own style is itself so persuasive that the reader feels him-or herself to be convinced." The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual