The Expats: A Novel

Kobo ebook | March 6, 2012

byChris Pavone

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
EDGAR AWARD WINNER  *  ANTHONY AWARD WINNER
BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF THE ACCIDENT

Can we ever escape our secrets?

In the cobblestoned streets of Luxembourg, Kate Moore's days are filled with playdates and coffee mornings, her weekends spent in Paris and skiing in the Alps. But Kate is also guarding a tremendous, life-defining secret—one that's become so unbearable that it begins to unravel her newly established expat life. She suspects that another American couple are not who they claim to be; her husband is acting suspiciously; and as she travels around Europe, she finds herself looking over her shoulder, increasingly terrified that her own past is catching up with her. As Kate begins to dig, to uncover the secrets of the people around her, she finds herself buried in layers of deceit so thick they threaten her family, her marriage, and her life.   
   Stylish and sophisticated, fiercely intelligent, and expertly crafted, The Expats proves Chris Pavone to be a writer of tremendous talent.

Now with an except from Chris Pavone's latest novel, The Accident

Also features Extra Libris material, including a reader’s guide and bonus content

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From the Publisher

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLEREDGAR AWARD WINNER  *  ANTHONY AWARD WINNERBESTSELLING AUTHOR OF THE ACCIDENTCan we ever escape our secrets?In the cobblestoned streets of Luxembourg, Kate Moore's days are filled with playdates and coffee mornings, her weekends spent in Paris and skiing in the Alps. But Kate is also guarding a tremendous, life...

Format:Kobo ebookPublished:March 6, 2012Publisher:Crown/ArchetypeLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0307956377

ISBN - 13:9780307956378

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Customer Reviews of The Expats: A Novel

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good debut 3.5/5 Chris Pavone's debut novel The Expats has been nominated for an Edgar Award - Best First Novel. And with good reason - it's a real page turner. Kate Moore has a secret - she's worked for the CIA since she left college. Along the way, she decided she wanted a family and married Dexter. Nice, safe, comfortable Dexter - of course she fully investigated him. And they've been blessed with two little boys. When Dexter gets a job offer in Luxembourg as a banking security specialist, Kate decides it's finally time to quit and just be a mom and wife. But can one really ever leave that kind of life behind? Will the past let you quit? And is your husband really who you thought he was? Kate joins the ranks of the expats in Luxembourg, trying to learn the language, navigate a new country and deal with the loneliness - Dexter's job keeps is keeping him away from home more and more. For a male writer, I thought Pavone nailed Kate's emotions - the boredom, the frustration, the loneliness, the uncertainty that she's made the right choice. But old habits die hard and Kate finds herself second guessing everyone she comes into contact with. Secrets is the name of the game here - everyone has them and the winner is the one who can figure them out first. Pavone certainly keeps the reader on their toes. He's chosen to tell the story in two narratives - past and present. Different typefaces help us distinguish which is which, but I will admit that I had difficulty in the beginning. In the present day narratives, we (mostly) know what has happened. Switching back to the past, we know more that Kate does as she tries to figure things out. But we still don't know it all - Pavone provides lots of twists to keep the story moving. I enjoyed having a woman as a protagonist in a 'spy' novel and I liked Kate as a character. There were a few times when an obvious clue seemed to elude her that I thought was out of character, but this is a minor complaint. The Ex-Pats was an excellent cat and mouse game, with the roles changing constantly between four main players. I can see this as a movie.
Date published: 2013-02-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Hard to Put Down The novel starts with a short Prelude that grabbed me into the story and didn't let go until the final word. I couldn't have stopped reading even had I wanted to. Mulitiple passports, rolls of cash and a gun, all signs of a family that's been on the run. We soon learn that Kate Moore is ex-CIA, is there really such a thing as leaving the CIA while still alive, and she has moved to Luxembourg when her husband Dexter was transferred there to a prestigious position in security. She has talked herself into believing that she is ready for a normal life of being a wife and mother to her two small children. It can't be that hard to socialize with the other expat wives. At least she believes this until she starts to suspect her new friends Julia and Bill of being much more than they appear. She is convinced that they are watching her and Dexter, but can't imagine why. Is Kate paranoid or should she be worried. And who should she be worried about. While I was reading, I could hardly put the book down. I carried it around the house with me and continued to read every chance I had. I was fascinated with Kate's life and how she was dealing with all the change in her life. Not only did she quit her job, but she moved countries and had to settle into a totally different lifestyle. Everyday she met with expats from many countries; could she trust these women or were they being her friend for very different reasons. I really had no feeling or connection with Dexter. All the way through the book, he was a mystery to me. Bill was much the same. I couldn't have cared less if anything had happened to these men. Julia I could have almost liked, but she seemed rather elusive when it came to the details, and it's always in the details when deciding whether I like a person. The plot lines kept me guessing the entire book. I wasn't able to outguess the author at any time. Very promising for a debut novel. I'll be looking forward to future books by Chris Pavone.
Date published: 2012-07-02