The Family Crucible: The Intense Experience Of Family Therapy by Augustus Y., Phd NapierThe Family Crucible: The Intense Experience Of Family Therapy by Augustus Y., Phd Napier

The Family Crucible: The Intense Experience Of Family Therapy

byAugustus Y., Phd Napier

Paperback | October 3, 2017

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The classic groundbreaking book on family therapy by acclaimed experts Augustus Y. Napier, Ph.D., and Carl Whitaker, M.D.

This extraordinary book presents scenarios of one family’s therapy experience and explains what underlies each encounter. You will discover the general patterns that are common to all families—stress, polarization and escalation, scapegoating, triangulation, blaming, and the diffusion of identity—and you will gain a vivid understanding of the intriguing field of family therapy.

“If you have a troubled marriage, a troubled child, a troubled self, if you’re in therapy or think that there’s no help for your predicament, The Family Crucible will give you insights . . . that are remarkably fresh and helpful.”New York Times Book Review

Augustus Y. Napier was born in Decatur, Georgia, in 1938 and graduated from Wesleyan University with a B.A. in English. After deciding to become a therapist through a personal therapy experience, he earned a Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of North Carolina. During an internship in the Department of Psychiatry at the Uni...
Title:The Family Crucible: The Intense Experience Of Family TherapyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.72 inPublished:October 3, 2017Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0060914890

ISBN - 13:9780060914899

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" . . . brings fresh insight to our understanding of family interactions, the forces that contribute to marital failure, and how family therapy can aid in revitalizing interpersonal relationships." (Psychology Today)