The Fear of Conspiracy: Images of Un-American Subversion from the Revolution to the Present by David Brion DavisThe Fear of Conspiracy: Images of Un-American Subversion from the Revolution to the Present by David Brion Davis

The Fear of Conspiracy: Images of Un-American Subversion from the Revolution to the Present

EditorDavid Brion Davis

Paperback | February 13, 2008

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First published by Cornell in 1971, The Fear of Conspiracy brings together eighty-five speeches, documents, and writings—the authors of which range from George Washington to Stokely Carmichael—that illustrate the role played in American history by the fear of conspiracy and subversion. This book, documenting two centuries of conspiracy-mongering (1763-1966), highlights the American tendency to search for subversive enemies and to construct terrifying dangers from fragmentary and highly circumstantial evidence.

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History at Yale University and director of Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. His previous books include The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, which won a National Book Award and the Bancroft Prize, and The Problem of Slavery in Western...
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Title:The Fear of Conspiracy: Images of Un-American Subversion from the Revolution to the PresentFormat:PaperbackDimensions:408 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.27 inPublished:February 13, 2008Publisher:Cornell University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0801491134

ISBN - 13:9780801491139

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Editorial Reviews

"Although Davis identifies six conspiratorial themes that run the gamut of American history, two ideas make a most impressive impact: the threat of a foreign conspiracy, and the challenge to the established order."—Baltimore Evening Sun