The Fisheries Treaty; Speech Of Hon. William P. Frye, Of Maine, In The Senate Of The United States…

Paperback | February 6, 2012

byWilliam Pierce Frye

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1888 Excerpt: ... less demands, and invited her colonies to the enactment of penal laws and the commission of outrages in their name which would disgrace any civilization. I call attention to Article I: And the United States hereby renounce forever any liberty heretofore enjoyed or claimed by the Inhabitants thereof to take, dry, or cure fish on or within 3 marine miles of any of the coasts, bays, creeks, or harbors of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America, not Included within the abovementioned limits. with a proviso that our fishermen might enter these bays, etc., for shelter or to repair damages, to purchase wood and take water, but for no other purpose whatever. What did we secure by this treaty? It provided for a partition of rights; it provided that we should surrender, I should say, two-thirds of all the waters our men had fought for and wrested from France. But we did have courage enough to insist that if our fishermen were driven by stress of weather into any of. these surrendered waters they should have shelter; if out of wood, they might purchase it; if their water-tanks were empty, they might fill them; if their vessels were out of repair, they might repair them, but we should resort to these waters " for no other purpose whatever." Time wore on, the United States grew in power, in population, in importance, immensely in the extent of our market. Great Britain, and Canada, too, looked at that market with avaricious eyes, and deliberately determined to possess themselves of it. There was no hesitation, no question of right, no regard for decency, no obligation of hospitality, but "Your market we propose to have." What for? So that the Canadian fishery fleet may be doubled or quadrupled, so that the Canadian sailors may be increased four, six, or eight times...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1888 Excerpt: ... less demands, and invited her colonies to the enactment of penal laws and the commission of outrages in their name which would d...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:22 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.05 inPublished:February 6, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217950957

ISBN - 13:9780217950954

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