The Force of Poetry by Christopher RicksThe Force of Poetry by Christopher Ricks

The Force of Poetry

byChristopher Ricks

Paperback | February 1, 1995

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Christopher Ricks is one of the best-known living critics of English, and was described by W. H. Auden as `the kind of critic every poet dreams of finding'. Though published indepenently over many years, each of the essays in this collection of his writings asks how a poets words reveal the `force of poetry', that force - in Dr Johnson's words - `which calls new power into being, which embodies sentiment, and animates matter'. The poets covered rangefrom John Gower, Marvell, and Milton to Wordsworth, Empson, Stevie Smith, Lowell, and Larkin, and the book contains four wider essays on cliches, lies, misquotations, and American English.
Christopher Ricks is one of the best-known living critics of English, and was described by W. H. Auden as `the kind of critic every poet dreams of finding'. He is author of Beckett's Dying Words (OUP, 1993), Keats and Embarrassment (OUP, 1974), and editor of The New Oxford Book of Victorian Verse (Oxford, 1987).
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Becketts Dying Words: The Clarendon Lectures 1990
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Title:The Force of PoetryFormat:PaperbackDimensions:462 pages, 7.72 × 5.08 × 1.06 inPublished:February 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198183267

ISBN - 13:9780198183266

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`Ricks sends you back to the texts he studies refreshed in the fountain of his own impressions. Reading him is like encountering poetry for the first time.'Roger Scruton, Sunday Telegraph