The Foreign Sources Of Modern English Versification; With Especial Reference To The So-called Iambic Lines Of 8 And 10 Syllables by Charlton Miner LewisThe Foreign Sources Of Modern English Versification; With Especial Reference To The So-called Iambic Lines Of 8 And 10 Syllables by Charlton Miner Lewis

The Foreign Sources Of Modern English Versification; With Especial Reference To The So-called…

byCharlton Miner Lewis

Paperback | January 10, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1898. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... sense of the word; for while most such verses in English have natural pauses after the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th syllable, such pauses are the almost necessary consequence of the verse-form, not one of its essential elements. Schipper relegates to a foot-note the suggestion that our heroic verse may have originated in a different way, either through an abridgement of the Alexandrine or through an extension of the 4-foot line. This is of course more nearly the true view, but it is entirely immaterial which of the last two explanations we hit upon. Accentual verses of 4, 6 and 7 feet were already familiar long before Chaucer's time. They exhibited a more or less regular alternation of arsis and thesis. To devise a verse which should be essentially the same in principle, but should have five accents instead of 4, 6 or 7, was a task that Chaucer's genius might well achieve unaided; and to call his product an imitation of a foreign verse built on entirely different principles, or even to call it specifically an abridgement of the Alexandrine or an extension of the shorter verse, seems almost a bit of supererogation. § 51. The syllabic principle in modern English verse. Our four-foot verse reached virtually its final stage of development under Chaucer's hands. Absolute syllabic regularity was not essential then, and it has never become so. Our five-foot verse, on the other hand, has taken one step further since Chaucer's time, and in its present form it affords some recognition--though feeble--to the syllabic principle.(i) In the first place, while it now not infrequently runs beyond the number of 10 syllables, it never falls short (1) The same thing might be asserted of the 4-foot verse; but, in view of the frequent employment of the Penseroso variety of this me...
Title:The Foreign Sources Of Modern English Versification; With Especial Reference To The So-called…Format:PaperbackDimensions:32 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.07 inPublished:January 10, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217081622

ISBN - 13:9780217081627

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