The Fortunes of the Courtier: The European Reception of Castiglione's Cortegiano

Paperback | January 1, 1996

byPeter Burke

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Because it was read so widely in Europe, the Courtier affords Burke an ideal test case for the diffusion and reception of ideas. From Poland and Hungary to England, Portugal, and even the New World, he takes us on a fascinating tour of courts, libraries, and reading rooms in search of Castiglione's ideal courtier. Informed by Burke's considerable knowledge of printing and publishing history, this book contributes to our growing understanding of the history of the book and to our knowledge of the Renaissance and its reception.

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From Our Editors

Because it was read so widely in Europe, the Courtier affords Burke an ideal test case for the diffusion and reception of ideas. From Poland and Hungary to England, Portugal, and even the New World, he takes us on a fascinating tour of courts, libraries, and reading rooms in search of Castiglione's ideal courtier. Informed by Burke's c...

From the Publisher

Because it was read so widely in Europe, the Courtier affords Burke an ideal test case for the diffusion and reception of ideas. From Poland and Hungary to England, Portugal, and even the New World, he takes us on a fascinating tour of courts, libraries, and reading rooms in search of Castiglione's ideal courtier. Informed by Burke's c...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:210 pages, 9 × 6.1 × 0.73 inPublished:January 1, 1996Publisher:Pennsylvania State University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0271015179

ISBN - 13:9780271015170

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From Our Editors

Because it was read so widely in Europe, the Courtier affords Burke an ideal test case for the diffusion and reception of ideas. From Poland and Hungary to England, Portugal, and even the New World, he takes us on a fascinating tour of courts, libraries, and reading rooms in search of Castiglione's ideal courtier. Informed by Burke's considerable knowledge of printing and publishing history, this book contributes to our growing understanding of the history of the book and to our knowledge of the Renaissance and its reception.