The Foundations Of Modern Science In The Middle Ages: Their Religious, Institutional and Intellectual Contexts by Edward GrantThe Foundations Of Modern Science In The Middle Ages: Their Religious, Institutional and Intellectual Contexts by Edward Grant

The Foundations Of Modern Science In The Middle Ages: Their Religious, Institutional and…

byEdward Grant

Paperback | October 28, 1996

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Contrary to prevailing opinion, the roots of modern science were planted in the ancient and medieval worlds long before the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century. Indeed, that revolution would have been inconceivable without the cumulative antecedent efforts of three great civilizations: Greek, Islamic, and Latin. With the scientific riches it derived by translation from Greco-Islamic sources in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the Christian Latin civilization of Western Europe began the last leg of the intellectual journey that culminated in a scientific revolution that transformed the world. The factors that produced this unique achievement are found in the way Christianity developed in the West, and in the invention of the university in 1200. A reference for historians of science or those interested in medieval history, this volume illustrates the developments and discoveries that culminated in the Scientific Revolution.
Title:The Foundations Of Modern Science In The Middle Ages: Their Religious, Institutional and…Format:PaperbackDimensions:266 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.59 inPublished:October 28, 1996Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521567629

ISBN - 13:9780521567626

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Table of Contents

Preface; 1. The Roman Empire and the first six centuries of Christianity; 2. The new beginning: The age of translation in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries; 3. The medieval university; 4. What the Middle Ages inherited from Aristotle; 5. The reception and impact of Aristotelian learning and the reaction of the Church and its theologians; 6. What the Middle Ages did with its Aristotelian legacy; 7. Medieval natural philosophy, Aristotelians, and Aristotelianism; 8. How the foundations of early modern science were laid in the Middle Ages.

Editorial Reviews

"This masterful study affirms the traditional view of the beginning of modern science -- with its emphasis upon experimentation, its concept of the progress and perpetuation of science, and its actual institutionalization -- in seventeenth-century Europe." Bradford B. Blaine, Historian