The French Revolution And The English Poets; A Study In Historical Criticism by Albert Elmer Hancock

The French Revolution And The English Poets; A Study In Historical Criticism

byAlbert Elmer Hancock

Paperback | February 8, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1899 Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VIII. COLERIDGE. I. Wordsworth's best life was a life apart. He was not by temperament receptive to the manifold impressions of the world about him; in no sense was he a versatile man. But lack of versatility and diverse sympathies was amply compensated by the depth and intensity of his own individual experience. The French Revolution like a rushing, roaring mountain stream dashed into the placidly flowing current of the poet's life; naturally it caused a momentary fulness, an overflowing of emotion. But soon, when the enthusiasm had passed, Wordsworth fell back into the old ways of brooding contemplation and retired to the seclusion of his native mountains. His friend Coleridge, however, was a man of different mould. His mind was more open, sensitive, more receptive to the multitudinous impressions of a world of human affairs. His life, if one compares it to a stream, flows somewhat sluggishly through the plains of civilization; it wanders through circuitous courses, through deltas, covers broad stretches of meadowland, and leaves behind, in neglect (rare spots for patient anglers), isolated lakes and bayous. Coleridge, unlike Wordsworth, was a versatile man; his work, though lacking in completeness, yet attained the highest distinction in many fields. He was a poet of nature, of romance, of the Revolution; he was a philosopher, linking the old school and the new; a lecturer on history; a theologian, a brilliant conversationalist; a successful journalist, a figure and force in politics; and last, but not least, an epoch-making critic. In such a career the French Revolution could play no role which obscured all others. Nevertheless that role was vital. For Coleridge had two impulses: the one, to withdraw from life and to bury himself in thought; the...

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Title:The French Revolution And The English Poets; A Study In Historical CriticismFormat:PaperbackDimensions:48 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.1 inPublished:February 8, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:021758912X

ISBN - 13:9780217589123

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