The Frontal Lobes and Voluntary Action

Paperback | July 1, 1995

byRichard E. Passingham

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This book presents an argument rather than a review: that the frontal lobes as a whole are specialized for voluntary action. For each area within the frontal lobes, a specific role in the execution of voluntary action is proposed. Topics covered include the control of movement in the motorcortex and premotor areas, decision-making in the pre-frontal cortex, response learning in the basal ganglia, and the mental trial and error that forms the basis of future responses. This analysis is based on the author's own work using the most up-to-date imaging techniques. Controversial andthought-provoking, it will serve as the basis for future work and debate on the subject.

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This book presents an argument rather than a review: that the frontal lobes as a whole are specialized for voluntary action. For each area within the frontal lobes, a specific role in the execution of voluntary action is proposed. Topics covered include the control of movement in the motorcortex and premotor areas, decision-making in ...

R. E. Passingham is at University of Oxford.

other books by Richard E. Passingham

The Neurobiology of the Prefrontal Cortex: Anatomy, Evolution, and the Origin of Insight
The Neurobiology of the Prefrontal Cortex: Anatomy, Evo...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:322 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.75 inPublished:July 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198523645

ISBN - 13:9780198523642

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Table of Contents

1. Voluntary action2. Motor cortex (area 4)3. Lateral premotor cortext (area 6)4. Medial premotor cortex (area 6)5. Premotor area 86. Dorsal prefrontal cortex (areas 4, 6 and 9)7. Ventral prefrontal cortex (areas 11, 12, 13 and 14)8. Basal ganglia9. The organisation of the frontal lobe10. Thought and voluntary action11. Speech

Editorial Reviews

`As a synthesis of so much work, the book forms an important contribution to the understanding of the role of the frontal lobes in behaviour'Laura H. Goldstein, Behaviour Research and Therapy, Vol. 34, No. 7, 1996