The Future Of Imprisonment

Paperback | August 5, 2006

EditorMichael Tonry

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The imprisonment rate in America has grown by a factor of five since 1972. In that time, punishment policies have toughened, compassion for prisoners has diminished, and prisons have gotten worse-a stark contrast to the origins of the prison 200 years ago as a humanitarian reform, a substitutefor capital and corporal punishment and banishment. So what went wrong? How can prisons be made simultaneously more effective and more humane? Who should be sent there in the first place? What should happen to them while they are inside? When, how, and under what conditions should they bereleased? The Future of Imprisonment unites some of the leading prisons and penal policy scholars of our time to address these fundamental questions. Inspired by the work of Norval Morris, the contributors look back to the past twenty-five years of penal policy in an effort to look forward to the prison'stwenty-first century future. Their essays examine the effects of current high levels of imprisonment on urban neighborhoods and the people who live in them. They reveal how current policies came to be as they are and explain the theories of punishment that guide imprisonment decisions. Finally, thecontributors argue for the strategic importance of controls on punishment including imprisonment as a limit on government power; chart the rise and fall of efforts to improve conditions inside; analyze the theory and practice of prison release; and evaluate the tricky science of predicting andpreventing recidivism. A definitive guide to imprisonment policies for the future, this volume convincingly demonstrates how we can prevent crime more effectively at lower economic and human cost.

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The imprisonment rate in America has grown by a factor of five since 1972. In that time, punishment policies have toughened, compassion for prisoners has diminished, and prisons have gotten worse-a stark contrast to the origins of the prison 200 years ago as a humanitarian reform, a substitutefor capital and corporal punishment and ban...

Michael Tonry is one of the nation's most respected experts on crime and punishment. The author of the highly acclaimed Malign Neglect and (with Norval Morris) Between Prison and Probation, he is director of the Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University, and Sonosky Professor of Law and Public Policy at the University of Minnesot...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 0.68 inPublished:August 5, 2006Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195314107

ISBN - 13:9780195314106

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Table of Contents

1. Michael Tonry: Has the Prison a FuturePart I: How Much Imprisonment is Too Much?2. Jeffrey Fagan: Crime, Law and the Community: Dynamics of Incarceration in New York City3. Alfred Blumstein: Restoring Rationality in Punishment PolicyPart II: Going In4. Richard S. Frase: Limiting Retributivism5. Marc L. Miller: Sentencing Reform "Reform" through Sentencing Information SystemsPart III: Being There6. Franklin E. Zimring and Gordon Hawkins: Democracy and the Limits of Punishment: A Preface to Prisoner's Rights7. James B. Jacobs: Prison Reform amid the Ruins of Prisoner's RightsPart IV: Coming Out8. Kevin R. Reitz: Questioning the Conventional Wisdom of Parole Release Authority9. John Monahan: The Future of Violence Management

Editorial Reviews

"There are a number of insightful and thought-provoking essays in this edited volume that have a great deal to offer to those studying the myriad questions surrounding how we should decide who goes to prison and for how long, how we should treat prisoners while incarcerated, and what should bethe basis for their release."--The Law and Politics Book Review