The Future of the Welfare State: Crisis Myths and Crisis Realities

Paperback | August 13, 2004

byFrancis G. Castles

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Written by one of the world's leading policy researchers, this book seeks to assess the threat posed to modern welfare states by globalization and demographic change. Bringing together empirical methods, current information from 21 advanced countries, and insights from across the social sciences, Castles distinguishes welfare crisis myths from welfare crisis realities, and presents likely trajectories of welfare state development in coming decades. The book will be essential reading for scholars from a broad range of disciplines, as well as policy-makers in many areas of government.

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Written by one of the world's leading policy researchers, this book seeks to assess the threat posed to modern welfare states by globalization and demographic change. Bringing together empirical methods, current information from 21 advanced countries, and insights from across the social sciences, Castles distinguishes welfare crisis my...

Francis G. Castles is a Professor of Social and Public Policy, University of Edinburgh.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:210 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.52 inPublished:August 13, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199273928

ISBN - 13:9780199273928

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Table of Contents

1. On Crises, Myths and Measurement2. A Race to the Bottom?3. The Structure of Social Provision4. A European Welfare State Convergence?5. Explaining Expenditure Outcomes6. Population Ageing and the Public Purse7. Birth-Rate Blues: A Real Crisis in the Making?8. Towards a Steady-State Welfare State

Editorial Reviews

"Castles' mastery of the complexity of the debates on the welfare state crisis is superb in its simplicity. Castles' objective to enhance modeling an focus on the comparability of data is a positive advance. His account is a spirited contribution." --Comparative Politics "A balanced discussion such as this book provides is not easy to find. ...Castles avoids ideology, instead using empirical evidence."--Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare