The Game of the Name: Introducing Logic, Language, and Mind

Paperback | November 1, 1994

byGregory McCulloch

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This book is a good introduction to modern work in an important field of analytic philosophy. The main concerns of analytic philosophy are the investigation of language and the analysis of mind. Work on the former is shaped by the seminal logical theories of Frege, whilst work on the latter ismainly concerned with materialism. It has long been recognized that the two are intimately connected. The recent growth of cognitive science has stimulated new work in the overlapping areas, much of which is unfortunately inaccessible to undergraduates. In this introduction to the subject, the author gives a clear explanation of Frege's basic logical ideas, and explains their application to ordinary language. He then shows how meaning is itself rooted in the philosophy of mind, and the question of intentionality - how the mind represents theworld. He concludes with an examination of the different ways in which thought can be 'about' individual material objects.

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This book is a good introduction to modern work in an important field of analytic philosophy. The main concerns of analytic philosophy are the investigation of language and the analysis of mind. Work on the former is shaped by the seminal logical theories of Frege, whilst work on the latter ismainly concerned with materialism. It has l...

Gregory McCulloch is at University of Nottingham.

other books by Gregory McCulloch

Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.71 inPublished:November 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198750862

ISBN - 13:9780198750864

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`The book strikes a nice balance between exposition of standard material and the development of the author's own position. There is much in it to admire.'History and Philosophy of Logic