The Gender Of Death: A Cultural History in Art and Literature by Karl S. GuthkeThe Gender Of Death: A Cultural History in Art and Literature by Karl S. Guthke

The Gender Of Death: A Cultural History in Art and Literature

byKarl S. Guthke

Paperback | March 28, 1999

Pricing and Purchase Info

$51.72

Earn 259 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

In this illustrated historical survey of the image of death in art and literature Karl S. Guthke assesses the significance of the various personifications of death in different ages and cultures, as male or female, enemy or lover, friend or avenger, angel or devil. Guthke shows that such images are reflections of the life and cultures that produced them, and through them he offers astonishing new insights into the nature and perception of the Western self in its cultural, intellectual, and literary context.
Title:The Gender Of Death: A Cultural History in Art and LiteratureFormat:PaperbackDimensions:312 pages, 9.72 × 6.85 × 0.67 inPublished:March 28, 1999Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521644607

ISBN - 13:9780521644600

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The Gender Of Death: A Cultural History in Art and Literature

Reviews

Table of Contents

Introduction: why this book? 1. Imagining the unimaginable: death personified; 2. The Middle Ages: the unfortunate Fall; 3. Renaissance and Baroque: the devil incarnate; 4. The Romantic age: 'How wonderful is death'; 5. From decadence to postmodernity: the stranger at the masked ball; Epilogue: death immortalising life.

From Our Editors

You can tell a lot about a culture by looking at how it personifies death. Karl S. Guthke reviews the image of death in the Western world through illustrations. The Gender Of Death demonstrates that death’s classification as male or female, enemy or lover, friend or avenger, angel or devil reveals important aspects of a society. On a more contemporary level, this book explores our own culture through these interesting depictions.

Editorial Reviews

'A rich array of examples of the personification of death in (mainly) European cultures. ... An eclectic and erudite survey of images of death as a hunter, horseman, lover, bridegroom, or chess-player.' Times Literary Supplement