The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden

by Jonas Jonasson

HarperCollins Canada | April 29, 2014 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden is rated 4.04 out of 5 by 25.

A wildly picaresque new novel from Jonas Jonasson, author of the internationally bestselling The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

In a tiny shack in the largest township in South Africa, Nombeko Mayeki is born. Put to work at five years old and orphaned at ten, she quickly learns that the world expects nothing more from her than to die young, be it from drugs, alcohol or just plain despair. But Nombeko has grander plans. She learns to read and write, and at just fifteen, using her cunning and fearlessness, she makes it out of Soweto with millions of smuggled diamonds in her possession. Then things take a turn for the worse . . .

Nombeko ends up the prisoner of an incompetent engineer in a research facility working on South Africa’s secret nuclear arsenal. Yet the unstoppable girl pulls off a daring escape to Sweden, where she meets twins named Holger One and Holger Two, who are carrying out a mission to bring down the Swedish monarchy . . . by any means necessary. Nombeko’s life ends up hopelessly intertwined with the lives of the twins, and when the twins arrange to kidnap the Swedish king and prime minister, it is up to our unlikely heroine to save the day—and possibly the world.

In this wild romp, Jonasson tackles issues ranging from the pervasiveness of racism to the dangers of absolute power while telling a charming and hilarious story along the way. In the satirical voice that has earned him legions of fans the world over, Jonasson gives us another rollicking tale of how even the smallest of decisions can have sweeping—even global—consequences.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: April 29, 2014

Publisher: HarperCollins Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1443431613

ISBN - 13: 9781443431613

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden

Kobo Edition (eBook) | April 29, 2014
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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good but not great!! I enjoyed the book and found it quirky and amusing but definitely preferred The 100 year old man who climbed out a window.
Date published: 2015-08-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Girl who saved the King of Sweeden A fun book to read. The misadventures of Nombeko and her cohorts are amusing , and the writing style makes them seem almost belivable.
Date published: 2015-06-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Hilarious If you're gonna tell a lie, it may as well be a whopper. Like the hundred year old man, this is a grand tale that makes no one expect it to be truthful, only entertaining. It is good entertainment to the end.
Date published: 2015-05-29
Rated 1 out of 5 by from misleading The most ridiculous book I have ever read. Goes from, the sublime (horrific) to the ridiculous. Abso.utely unbelievable, even though I knew it was a satire.
Date published: 2015-04-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from The girl who saved the king of Sweden Became a bit tedious & predictable. Could have been a bit more fast paced. Characters just bizzare enough to keep one interested.
Date published: 2015-04-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good read I did not enjoy this as much as his 100 year old man story. I found the characters of the first brother and his girlfriend to be tiresome after a while. The rest of the story was good and well written.
Date published: 2015-03-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The girl who saved the king of sweden Another great book by Jonas Jonasson. Great story, wonderful escape from the everyday. We need to see more from him.
Date published: 2015-01-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Meh... I finished it because I felt obligated to do so for my book club. I thought the patter of 'the 100 year-old man who...' was cute, but when it appeared again in this novel it just felt inauthentic.
Date published: 2015-01-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The girl who saved the king of sweden Quite a confabulated read. Lots of twists and loops. Very enjoyable. Really needed to get !to the end to find out what the outcome was.
Date published: 2015-01-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The girl who save the king of Sweden Another fantastic read.
Date published: 2014-09-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amusing story Lots of twists and turns which keeps the reader's attention
Date published: 2014-08-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Girl Who Saved the King of Swede Excellent writing - a good humorous taste of personal and historical fiction A wonderfully humorous tale of personal and historical fiction.
Date published: 2014-08-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The girl who saved the king of Swede I love Jonas Jonasson novels and this one didn't disappoint. It,s a fun journey through history while reading a fantastic story.
Date published: 2014-07-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Almost as funny as "The Hundred Year I am a fan of this writer after reading these two books. A great way addition to my summer reading!
Date published: 2014-07-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Highly recommended This is a great read. Filled with a sarcastic wit and humour throughout. Unpredictable and laugh out loud.
Date published: 2014-07-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Entertaining but somewhat slow read This story was witty and decently entertaining, but it was at times slow-paced and I found myself always putting it down.
Date published: 2014-07-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from The Girl Who Saved the King of Swede Good but not as good as The Old Man Who ......
Date published: 2014-07-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Girl Who Saved The King of Swede Fun read! Jonasson has the ability to incorporate history into a whimsical story.
Date published: 2014-06-22
Rated 2 out of 5 by from -.- Having read The Hundred Year Old Man, I was excited to begin this. I was deeply disappointed. I disliked the characters, found the entire situation ludicrous, and was just annoyed reading it.
Date published: 2014-06-20

– More About This Product –

Kobo eBookThe Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden

The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden

by Jonas Jonasson

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: April 29, 2014

Publisher: HarperCollins Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1443431613

ISBN - 13: 9781443431613

From the Publisher

A wildly picaresque new novel from Jonas Jonasson, author of the internationally bestselling The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

In a tiny shack in the largest township in South Africa, Nombeko Mayeki is born. Put to work at five years old and orphaned at ten, she quickly learns that the world expects nothing more from her than to die young, be it from drugs, alcohol or just plain despair. But Nombeko has grander plans. She learns to read and write, and at just fifteen, using her cunning and fearlessness, she makes it out of Soweto with millions of smuggled diamonds in her possession. Then things take a turn for the worse . . .

Nombeko ends up the prisoner of an incompetent engineer in a research facility working on South Africa’s secret nuclear arsenal. Yet the unstoppable girl pulls off a daring escape to Sweden, where she meets twins named Holger One and Holger Two, who are carrying out a mission to bring down the Swedish monarchy . . . by any means necessary. Nombeko’s life ends up hopelessly intertwined with the lives of the twins, and when the twins arrange to kidnap the Swedish king and prime minister, it is up to our unlikely heroine to save the day—and possibly the world.

In this wild romp, Jonasson tackles issues ranging from the pervasiveness of racism to the dangers of absolute power while telling a charming and hilarious story along the way. In the satirical voice that has earned him legions of fans the world over, Jonasson gives us another rollicking tale of how even the smallest of decisions can have sweeping—even global—consequences.