The Glass Closet: Why Coming Out Is Good Business by John BrowneThe Glass Closet: Why Coming Out Is Good Business by John Browne

The Glass Closet: Why Coming Out Is Good Business

byJohn Browne

Hardcover | June 17, 2014

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Part memoir and part social criticism, The Glass Closet addresses the issue of homophobia that still pervades corporations around the world and underscores the immense challenges faced by LGBT employees.

In The Glass Closet, Lord John Browne, former CEO of BP, seeks to unsettle business leaders by exposing the culture of homophobia that remains rampant in corporations around the world, and which prevents employees from showing their authentic selves.

Drawing on his own experiences, and those of prominent members of the LGBT community around the world, as well as insights from well-known business leaders and celebrities, Lord Browne illustrates why, despite the risks involved, self-disclosure is best for employees—and for the businesses that support them. Above all, The Glass Closet offers inspiration and support for those who too often worry that coming out will hinder their chances of professional success.

John Browne was the CEO of BP from 1995 to 2007, which he transformed into one of the world's largest companies. He was the president of the Royal Academy of Engineering and is a fellow of the Royal Society, a foreign member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the chairman of the trustees of the Tate galleries. He holds d...
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Title:The Glass Closet: Why Coming Out Is Good BusinessFormat:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.85 inPublished:June 17, 2014Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0062316974

ISBN - 13:9780062316974

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Editorial Reviews

“Culturally significant....[Browne] has taken pains to provide strikingly honest personal narratives and uses them to put a face on the problems at hand.”